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Synopsis

A signature brew of camaraderie, knockabout humor, excessive quaffing, questionable life choices, hand-to-hand combat, and explosive surprises, The World’s End reteams director Edgar Wright with actors Simon Pegg and Nick Frost, following their hits Shaun of the Dead (2004) and Hot Fuzz (2007).

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Inside the Film

Watch Now: New Videos
Watch Now: New Videos
The World's End Motion Poster
The World's End Motion Poster
Simon Pegg
Simon Pegg
Featurette: The World's End
Featurette: The World's End
Nick Frost
Nick Frost
Edgar Wright
Edgar Wright
Friends Reunited
Friends Reunited
The Gang's All Here
The Gang's All Here
The Beginning of THE END
The Beginning of THE END
From Crawl to Brawl
From Crawl to Brawl
Getting The World's End Write
Getting The World's End Write
THE WORLD'S END Premiere in London
THE WORLD'S END Premiere in London

Cast & Crew

Simon  Pegg
Simon Pegg
Gary King
Actor/screenwriter Simon Pegg’s breakthrough success was the Channel 4 sitcom Spaced. With Jessica Hynes, he co-wrote and starred in the show, which was directed by Edgar Wright. A second series was commissioned before the first had even been broadcast. The show was nominated for Best Sitcom, and he for Best TV Newcomer, at the British Comedy Awards; and the program also received BAFTA, Montreux, and International Emmy Award nominations.

He and director Edgar Wright then co-scripted the feature Shaun of the Dead, in which he starred opposite Spaced alumnus Nick Frost. The zombie tale opened in the #2 spot at the U.K. box office and found success in the U.S. Mr. Pegg was honored with the Peter Sellers Award for Comedy from the Evening Standard British Film Awards. The movie was nominated for two BAFTA Awards, including Outstanding British Film of the Year; and won the British Independent Film Award (BIFA) for Best Screenplay.

After conquering zombies, award ceremonies, and the U.S., Mr. Pegg next co-scripted with director Edgar Wright the übercop action comedy Hot Fuzz, in which he again starred with Nick Frost. The picture opened at #1 atop the U.K. box office and was a hit in the U.S. Mr. Pegg was an Empire Award nominee for Best Actor, and the movie won Best Comedy and was voted Best Comedy at the U.K.’s National Movie Awards.

With Nick Frost, he co-scripted the science-fiction adventure Paul, in which the duo starred under the direction of Greg Mottola, and which was voted Best Comedy at the U.K.’s National Movie Awards. Among Mr. Pegg’s other works as screenwriter are Run, Fatboy, Run, in which he starred for director David Schwimmer.

Audiences worldwide have seen him starring alongside Tom Cruise in Mission: Impossible III and Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol, directed by J.J. Abrams and Brad Bird, respectively; and in Mr. Abrams’ Star Trek and Star Trek Into Darkness.

His other starring roles on-screen include John Landis’ Burke and Hare; Crispian Mills and Chris Hopewell’s A Fantastic Fear of Everything; Robert B. Weide’s How to Lose Friends & Alienate People; and Peter Chelsom’s upcoming Hector and the Search for Happiness, in which he plays the title role and stars with Rosamund Pike of The World’s End.

His voiceover and/or motion-capture work as actor includes the Ice Age series; and, with Nick Frost, Steven Spielberg’s The Adventures of Tintin and, upcoming for Focus Features and LAIKA, The Boxtrolls, directed by Anthony Stacchi and Graham Annable.

Aside from Spaced, Mr. Pegg starred as a series regular on such sitcoms as Faith in the Future and Asylum, which marked his first collaboration with Edgar Wright and Jessica Hynes; guest-starred on Doctor Who and I’m Alan Partridge, among other shows; and in the sketch series Big Train, for which he received an Royal Television Society Award nomination for Best Entertainment Performance.His other notable television appearances include the classic miniseries Band of Brothers.

Nick Frost
Nick Frost
Andy Knightley

Nick Frost first came to prominence in the award-winning Channel 4 sitcom Spaced, playing Mike Watt – a character he had originally created to amuse his real-life best friend Simon Pegg. In addition to teaming the two friends, the show also marked Mr. Frost’s first collaboration with director Edgar Wright, and the trio went on to make the hit movies Shaun of the Dead – for which Mr. Frost was a British Independent Film Award nominee and a Fangoria Chainsaw Award winner – and Hot Fuzz.

Ever since, Mr. Frost has become one of the U.K.’s most sought-after actors. He has hosted series of his own for Channel 5, Danger! 50,000 Volts! and Danger! Incoming Attack!; appeared in the Channel 4 sitcom Black Books; starred in the BBC sketch-comedy series Man Stroke Woman; and played the lead in the BBC2 sci-fi comedy series Hyperdrive.

His other movie credits include Rupert Sanders’ blockbuster Snow White and the Huntsman; Richard Curtis’ Pirate Radio, a.k.a. The Boat That Rocked, also for Working Title and Focus Features; Julian Jarrold’s Kinky Boots; Mark Palansky’s Penelope; Nick Moore’s Wild Child’; and Joe Cornish’s award-winning Attack the Block. He will soon be seen starring and dancing opposite Rashida Jones in James Griffiths’ Cuban Fury, on which he also served as executive producer and for which he conceived the original story idea.

With Simon Pegg, Mr. Frost wrote the original screenplay Paul, which they starred in for Working Title under the direction of Greg Mottola, and for which he received a National Movie Award nomination in the U.K. Mr. Frost and Mr. Pegg subsequently portrayed Hergé’s beloved detectives Thomson & Thompson, respectively, for Steven Spielberg’s epic motion-capture feature The Adventures of Tintin; and are doing voice work for Focus Features and LAIKA’s upcoming animated tale The Boxtrolls, directed by Anthony Stacchi and Graham Annable.

His lead performance in the BBC adaptation of Martin Amis’ Money, directed by Jeremy Lovering, garnered acclaim from critics and the author alike. Mr. Frost next stars in the title role of the 1960s-set Sky Atlantic television series Mr. Sloane, from writer/director Robert B. Weide, alongside Olivia Colman and Ophelia Lovibond.

Paddy  Considine
Paddy Considine
Steven Prince
As actor, Paddy Considine previously teamed with The World’s End director Edgar Wright and actors Simon Pegg and Nick Frost on the action comedy Hot Fuzz.

As writer/director, he won a BAFTA Award for Dog Altogether, starring Peter Mullan, which was named Best Short Film. He again won a BAFTA Award for his feature writing/directing debut, Tyrannosaur, which was cited as the Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer. The feature won British Independent Film Awards (BIFA) for Best British Independent Film, Best Actress (Olivia Colman), and the Douglas Hickox Award (given to Mr. Considine); and was BIFA-nominated for Best Achievement in Production, Best Director, Best Actor (Mr. Mullan), and Best Supporting Actor (Eddie Marsan). Among the other honors accorded Tyrannosaur were Spirit Award and Writers’ Guild of Great Britain Award nominations for Mr. Considine; the Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for Ms. Colman; and, at the Sundance Film Festival, a Special Jury Prize for Ms. Colman and Mr. Mullan as well as the Directing Award (in the World Cinema’s Dramatic category) for Mr. Considine.

He co-wrote Dead Man’s Shoes, with directorShane Meadows, for whom he had previously starred in A Room for Romeo Brass. Dead Man’s Shoes earned him BIFA nominations for both Best Screenplay and Best Actor; a London Film Critics Circle Award nomination for Best Actor; and the Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actor. Dead Man’s Shoes was also nominated for the BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film of the Year. He starred for Mr. Meadows again in Le Donk & Scor-zay-zee.

Mr. Considine’s other film credits include Jim Sheridan’s In America, for which he shared a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination with his fellow actors from the ensemble; Ron Howard’s Cinderella Man; Stephen Woolley’s Stoned; Michael Winterbottom’s 24 Hour Party People; Richard Ayoade’s Submarine; Ol Parker’s Now is Good, opposite Dakota Fanning and Olivia Williams; playing the title role in The Half Life of Timofey Berezin, a.k.a. Pu-239, adapted and directed by Scott Z. Burns; Paul Greengrass’ The Bourne Ultimatum, alongside Matt Damon; and James Marsh’s “1980” feature in the Red Riding trilogy.

Writer/director Pawel Pawlikowski’s My Summer of Love brought Mr. Considine a BIFA nomination for Best Supporting Actor. He had earlier starred for the filmmaker in Last Resort, for which he was named Best Actor at the Thessaloniki Film Festival. My Summer of Love, also for Focus Features, won two Evening Standard British Film Awards; the top prize at the Edinburgh International Film Festival; and the BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Film of the Year.

The native of Burton-Upon-Trent has also starred in Christopher Morris’ BAFTA Award-winning short film My Wrongs 8245-8249 and 117.

Martin Freeman
Martin Freeman
Oliver Chamberlain
Martin Freeman continues to capture audience attention and critical acclaim with his versatile acting in comedies, dramas, and epic fantasy adventures.

Moviegoers last saw him starring as J.R.R. Tolkien’s brave Bilbo Baggins in Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, which grossed over $1 billion worldwide. His performance brought him the Empire Award for Best Actor. He continues Bilbo’s tale in Mr. Jackson’s The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, opening in December 2013, and The Hobbit: There and Back Again, to be released in December 2014.

Mr. Freeman recently won a BAFTA Award, and was an Emmy Award nominee, for his portrayal of John Watson in the U.K. television series Sherlock, on which he stars opposite Benedict Cumberbatch. Two seasons of the show have aired thus far, and a third is in production.

Among his other notable television work has been starring as Jim in the celebrated original U.K. series version of The Office, with Ricky Gervais, for which he received BAFTA and British Comedy Award nominations; staring in the series Hardware, for which he won the Golden Rose Award for Best Male Comedy Performance; and Joe Wright’s BAFTA Award-winning miniseries The Last King, with his fellow The World’s End actor Eddie Marsan.

Mr. Freeman trained at the University of London’s Central School of Speech & Drama. His extensive stage work has included Royal National Theatre productions of Volpone, directed by Matthew Warchus, and Mother Courage and Her Children, directed by Jonathan Kent; The Comedians, directed by Sean Holmes with the Oxford Stage Company; The Exonerated, directed by Bob Balaban at Riverside Studios; the Pulitzer Prize Award-winning Clybourne Park, directed by Dominic Cook, at the Royal Court Theatre; and Jump to Cow Heaven, directed by William Kerley, which won the top prize at the Edinburgh Festival in 1997.

He was part of the ensemble cast in Richard Curtis’ Love Actually, which has become a worldwide film favorite. Moviegoers have also seen him in the lead roles of Garth Jennings’ The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Jake Paltrow’s The Good Night, the latter with his fellow The World’s End actor Simon Pegg; Debbie Isitt’s improvisational comedies Confetti and Nativity!; Justin Theroux’s Dedication; Peter Greenaway’s Nightwatching, as the painter Rembrandt, and Anthony Minghella’s Breaking and Entering.

Mr. Freeman previously teamed with The World’s End director Edgar Wright on Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz.

Eddie Marsan
Eddie Marsan
Peter Page
Eddie Marsan’s memorable performance opposite Sally Hawkins in Mike Leigh’s Happy-Go-Lucky brought him the British Independent Film Award (BIFA), as well as the National Society of Film Critics (in the U.S.) award, for Best Supporting Actor. He had previously won the BIFA for his portrayal in Mr. Leigh’s Vera Drake, opposite Imelda Staunton, Phil Davis, and Alex Kelly.

He was again a BIFA nominee for his performance in Tyrannosaur, written and directed by his fellow The World’s End actor Paddy Considine, opposite Olivia Colman.

Mr. Marsan’s numerous other films include Steven Spielberg’s War Horse; Martin Scorsese’s Gangs of New York; Alejandro González Iñárritu’s 21 Grams, also for Focus Features, opposite Benicio Del Toro; Terrence Malick’s The New World;  J.J. Abrams’ Mission: Impossible III, with his fellow The World’s End actor Simon Pegg; Isabel Coixet’s The Secret Life of Words; Neil Burger’s The Illusionist; James McTeigue’s V for Vendetta; Peter Berg’s Hancock, with Will Smith; Richard Linklater’s Me and Orson Welles, as John Houseman; Julian Jarrold’s “1974” feature in the Red Riding trilogy; J Blakeson’s The Disappearance of Alice Creed, for which he received an Evening Standard British Film Award nomination for Best Actor; Rupert Sanders’ blockbuster Snow White and the Huntsman; Bryan Singer’s Jack the Giant Slayer; and, as Inspector Lestrade, Guy Ritchie’s two Sherlock Holmes movies, opposite Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law.

The U.K. native worked as a printer before turning to acting. He attended Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts, and studied at the Academy of the Science of Acting & Directing (ASAD) under its founder Sam Kogan. His stage work includes starring at The National Theatre, in Roger Michell’s production of The Homecoming and Howard Davies’ staging of Chips with Everything; and touring in the title role of Richard III, directed by Guy Retallack.

Mr. Marsan’s U.K. television work includes Joe Wright’s telefilm Bodily Harm and miniseries The Last King, the latter with his fellow The World’s End actor Martin Freeman; guest appearances on such series as Criminal Justice and The Bill; and a starring role in the series Get Well Soon.  In the summer of 2013, he will be seen starring opposite Liev Schreiber and Jon Voight on the drama series Ray Donovan, premiering on Showtime in the U.S.

Rosamund  Pike
Rosamund Pike
Sam Chamberlain
Cast in her first major film as an iconic Bond Girl at the age of 21 just out of Oxford University, Rosamund Pike starred opposite Pierce Brosnan and Halle Berry in Lee Tamahori’s Die Another Day. For her performance, she won the Empire Award for Best Newcomer. She later starred in Joe Wright’s Pride & Prejudice, also for Focus Features and Working Title, for which she received a London Critics Circle Film Award nomination. Additionally, she starred in Laurence Dunmore’s The Libertine, with Johnny Depp, for which she won a British Independent Film Award (BIFA). Ms. Pike was again a BIFA and London Critics Circle Film Award nominee for her performances in Nigel Cole’s Made in Dagenham and Lone Scherfig’s An Education. The latter film also brought her a Screen Actors Guild Award nomination shared with her fellow actors from the ensemble.

Her performance opposite Paul Giamatti in Richard J. Lewis’ Barney’s Version earned her London Critics Circle Film, Genie, and Satellite Award nominations. Among her other features are Jeremy Podeswa’s Fugitive Pieces, for which Ms. Pike was also a Genie Award nominee; Gregory Hoblit’s Fracture, with Ryan Gosling; Jonathan Mostow’s Surrogates, with Bruce Willis; Christopher Landon’s Burning Palms; Oliver Parker’s Johnny English Reborn, alongside Rowan Atkinson; David Frankel’s The Big Year, opposite Owen Wilson; Jonathan Liebesman’s Wrath of the Titans, with Sam Worthington; Christopher McQuarrie’s Jack Reacher, alongside Tom Cruise; and Pascal Chaumeil’s soon-to-be-released A Long Way Down, based on the Nick Hornby novel. She is currently at work on Peter Chelsolm’s Hector and the Search for Happiness, in which she stars with Simon Pegg of The World’s End.

Having joined the National Youth Theatre as a teenager, Ms. Pike continues to return to her stage roots, most recently starring in the U.K. touring production of Hedda Gabler. She won critical praise for her starring role in Hitchcock Blonde, written and directed by Terry Johnson; starred in Gaslight at the Old Vic Theater; and starred opposite Judi Dench in the Wyndhams Theatre production of Madame de Sade. Among her television work, she notably starred in Miranda Bowen’s miniseries version of Women in Love.

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