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Peter saw his first movie when he was just a little boy, and has never gotten over that experience.

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Far Blogging Out!

Posted April 23, 2008

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A recent Harris interactive poll finds that gay and lesbian adults are bloggier than their heterosexual counterparts. As noted in Advocate.com, a nationwide survey of 2,733 adults shows that "fifty-one percent of gay and lesbian adults who use the Internet regularly read blogs, while just 36% of heterosexuals." Moreover 27% have posted comments to blogs, opposed to a straight 13%, and 21% of the gays and lesbians have written their own blog, compared to only 7% of heterosexuals who have sought out an on-line prescence.

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This is good news for us. We'll be discussing -- and hopefully have lots of guest gay and lesbian bloggers writing about -- several gay films. Besides the gay-friendly Hamlet 2 (out in August), we'll be doing extensive coverage on Gus Van Sant's Milk, the long awaited story of Harvey Milk with Sean Penn in the title role. Moreover, Focus Features just announced Ang Lee's next film, a period piece for the peace generation based on the legendary 1969 concert. The project is based on James Schamus' script adapted from Elliot Tiber's memoir Taking Woodstock: A True Story of a Riot, a Concert, and a Life. Tiber's book is mind-blowing in itself. A schlumpy Brooklyn Jewish boy growing up in the sixties is forced to help his crazy folks run a decrepit motel up in Bethel NY, and in the process finds he has a music concert permit to offer Michael Lang and the promoters of Woodstock when their original place falls apart. But that is only half the story. Tiber, in the process of finding himself, bumps into the painter Mark Rothko and Robert Mapplethorpe, hangs out at the Stonewall bar and services rough trade at the mine shaft -- all before Woodstock even appears on the horizon. But in the end the book isn't about the sixties as about one gay man learning from the Summer of Love how to love himself.