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About Jenna Cato Bass

I'm a director, writer, photographer, aspiring explorer and retired magician living in Cape Town, South Africa

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Sundance Part 6

Posted January 28, 2010

I thinks its possible that I have actually been speaking too much in the past few days, but I am very excited to tell you (both in a collective and personal sense depending on taste and relationship) about this:

I think I mentioned I'd plucked up the courage to invite the AV Club to one of our screenings in Park City - I usually devour their festival coverage and in quiet times at the video store we often read their insightful reviews. Or at least I do. So it was a big deal for me to invite them (I mean, what if they didn't like it??) and I didn't even know if they'd make it through. I left a ticket at the press office and waited. On tenterhooks, whatever those may be. And lo! Today, while on the shuttle (obsessively googling for any sign of press, I must confess), I found it:

-Jenna Bass’ “The Tunnel,” about a little girl using stories to help explain (and escape) what happened to her father during Zimbabwe’s Matabeleland Massacres of the early ‘80s. The specificity of the short is remarkable, given that it’s only 25 minutes long, but the real selling point of “The Tunnel” is the imagination Bass puts into the storytelling from both a structural and visual perspective. The story itself is nested in an oddly organic way, with one flashback leading to another, and Bass even inserts a few lovely animated sequences. It’s a strong piece.

You can read the whole article (and I'd recommend checking out the whole site - I don't usually read film commentary/criticism, but this I make time for) click here.

Other signs of The Tunnel in the press are over at INDIEWIRE and ESSENCE.com 

And something else cool, before I sign out: At a screening at a really boring film (which was made all the more annoying by the fact that it's concept was so great) - I accidently sat next to a very nice programmer for Director's Fortnight at Cannes. The crazy thing was, i couldn't figure out what he programmed for for most of the conversation - he made out that it was small, no big deal. But again, this probably worked out in my favour because I was able to hand him, quite calmly, a copy of the film. So ignorance evidently is bliss. At least in matters of social interaction. 

PS: Tomorrow - No stone left unturned! No avenue unexplored! No length is too great! It is.......... The Assault on Walter Murch!

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Sundance Part 6

Posted January 28, 2010

I thinks its possible that I have actually been speaking too much in the past few days, but I am very excited to tell you (both in a collective and personal sense depending on taste and relationship) about this:

I think I mentioned I'd plucked up the courage to invite the AV Club to one of our screenings in Park City - I usually devour their festival coverage and in quiet times at the video store we often read their insightful reviews. Or at least I do. So it was a big deal for me to invite them (I mean, what if they didn't like it??) and I didn't even know if they'd make it through. I left a ticket at the press office and waited. On tenterhooks, whatever those may be. And lo! Today, while on the shuttle (obsessively googling for any sign of press, I must confess), I found it:

-Jenna Bass’ “The Tunnel,” about a little girl using stories to help explain (and escape) what happened to her father during Zimbabwe’s Matabeleland Massacres of the early ‘80s. The specificity of the short is remarkable, given that it’s only 25 minutes long, but the real selling point of “The Tunnel” is the imagination Bass puts into the storytelling from both a structural and visual perspective. The story itself is nested in an oddly organic way, with one flashback leading to another, and Bass even inserts a few lovely animated sequences. It’s a strong piece.

You can read the whole article (and I'd recommend checking out the whole site - I don't usually read film commentary/criticism, but this I make time for) click here.

Other signs of The Tunnel in the press are over at INDIEWIRE and ESSENCE.com 

And something else cool, before I sign out: At a screening at a really boring film (which was made all the more annoying by the fact that it's concept was so great) - I accidently sat next to a very nice programmer for Director's Fortnight at Cannes. The crazy thing was, i couldn't figure out what he programmed for for most of the conversation - he made out that it was small, no big deal. But again, this probably worked out in my favour because I was able to hand him, quite calmly, a copy of the film. So ignorance evidently is bliss. At least in matters of social interaction. 

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Sundancing Part 5

Posted January 27, 2010

Wednesday // 12:30pm

So, the snow is flitting down again and I have just come out of the Sundance Industry Meetings. This was one of the things I've been most excited about in the lead up to the festival. And indeed it was an interesting experience. Wanuri and I were so lucky to be there, a fact I only realised when we arrived - I'd assumed the other short filmmakers would be there too, but apart from us, everyone had features. What it was was a series of one on ones with US agents/distributers/industry members - some small, some big, some really big - but all with an interest in international talent and content. And so we sell ourselves. Normally I find these things horrifically painful - watching and waiting for some sign of approval from whomever it is - do they like me do they like me, etc. ad nauseum. And that impresses no one. But this time, maybe I knew what to expect, or maybe I was just honest with myself, so I got through it. And actually enjoyed it. Some of them made it quite obvious - without saying it - that they were in no way interested unless i unzipped my skin and turned out to be Neil Blomkamp's clone in disgiuse. But others were very nice. And interested too. It started me thinking again on the matter of what it would take to work overseas - and thus with an American agent/partner - and my conclusion, which I honestly told them, is thus: I want to make films in Africa. About Africa. That is most exciting for me and it is what I want to do know. Not to mention it is what I know. But I want to make films and I want them to be seen by many many people. So if an international project came along, one that I looked at, and thought that I, only I, could bring something to it, then YES. Of course. So that is what I told them. But just some of the things we spoke about made my head spin: I suppose it's a matter of wanting something for ages and then suddenly someone suggesting that it is possible. One will seldom jump into it and believe it to be so. So I'll see what comes. There were come cool people there and hopefully we can correspond. I stole a bagel on the way out and left with much to ponder over.....

Wednesday // 14:30

Now I'm waiting in the theatre for our third screening. This may be an interesting one, as I think whatever word of mouth we may have generated may manifest today after the gap between our screenings. So I'm really early, as I usually end up being because if I'm not really early I'll be really late. That seems to be the rule. But being here now means I get to watch the audience come in which is damn exciting. I heard of one feature filmmaker who hid in the bathroom after his screening to hear what people really thought of his film. Personally, I prefer the anticipation. 

Wednesday // 18:00

Screening over. We actually ducked out to get to a press event which was crowded and a bit scary. Race back in a taxi, but make it in good time. Q&A good. Highlights include the first person asking me about the history of the 5th Brigade and Gukurahundi, which I hope I was able to answer adequately. But at least someone asked. And also someone asked my age and when I said, '23' someone said "Get out" or something like that, which was quite cool, I think. 

Got some more time before my screening - an 20:30 screening of Winter's Bone - trying to decide if I should make the mission to Main Street to get dinner - there is this great pressure to get OUT and MEET people. Which is understandable. But I suppose even great producers still need to have leftover oatmeal in their hotel rooms, right? He he, perhaps not....

Laters!

 

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Sundancing Part 4

Posted January 27, 2010

So what is Sundance really like? I don't know, for those back home, or afar, whether I have done it justice, given an adequate description. Herewith follows a day in the life style outline of events:

 

Wake up. So tired. Why am I so tired? Oh yes, because I went to sleep at 4.30am. Wish I had the shower I didn't have last night. 

On the bus. Overhear someone closing a deal on a $3mill picture. What I couldn't do with R25,000,000....

Really cold. 

Watch Harold and Maude on the big screen. 35mm print. A bit scratched but pure magic. Like watching it for the first time. I cry in parts. The direction is amazing. part of me thinks they don't make em like this anymore. 

Go to a product demonstration. See the Red's scarlet - love at first sight. 

Get email from Cape Times - they want to do a feature on the film. Their interview questions are great - Werner Herzog is even mentioned. Will get to talk about Werner Herzog in a South African newspaper - best thing ever. 

See Diego Luna in a cafe. I think it's him. Too shy to say hi. 

Pick up a flyer for an interesting film. Realise hands are shaking. 

Sitting in a cinema, a man sits down next to you and asks if you directed The Tunnel. Yes. He says it's the best film he's seen at the festival. You talk about it for a while and then he leaves. You try to go back to reading the paper, but really you can't. 

On the bus. Come Together is playing on the stereo.

 

So that is relatively typical. Up until recently I've been subsisting on a diet purely of Clif Bars (I think they should be my festival sponsors next time) - being a vegan in park city isn't too easy... though there are some great cookies, if you're interested. 

So I just came home, crushed at having missed an opportunity of being introduced by Kisha to Christine Vachon (!!!!). Spirits lifted somewhat by this first really great review blogged on the Sundance site by Gene Buzzard. The Tunnel part is below, but I recommend the rest of the article too to hear about Wanuri and Dyana's films...

The three films presented at the New African Cinema screening differed in almost everything except their beauty and freshness.  In Tunnel  South African filmmaker Jenna Bass brings us into the brutality of the Zimbabwean civil war through the eyes and mind of a remarkable young girl called Rabbit.  Rabbit witnesses her father and the other men of her village digging their own graves, supervised by smartly uniformed government soldiers.  Rabbit deals with this and other atrocities with an elaborate series of fanciful rationalizations that gradually turn into an acceptance of the harshness of her situation that is both courageous and deeply intelligent.  This film is at times hard to watch, but is always absorbing and its authentic depiction of the growing ability of a young girl to deal honestly with an horrific situation affirms the human spirit without letting the rest of us off the hook for allowing such atrocities-- this is a film that needs to be seen.

Couldn't be better! 

I asked Jacques what he thought i should blog about in future while still at Sundance and he said: "The industry process and the reality of being thrown into it." Good answer, Jacques. The reality is that I have come to some unexpected conclusions. Though I made a point of not getting my hopes up when it came to the usual Sundance-related optimism, namely US agents/distribution/deals/funding/festivals/showers of gold and silver, I did have it in mind as something to be ready for. Now that I have been speaking to a few people and giving the matter more thought, I had the following epiphany: The next three projects (features) I intend to work on, I conceived when Sundance seemed like a far off dream. Thus, they were intentionally chosen for their low budgets, practicality and also the viabilities of me doing them myself - hopefully with producers and funders and those sorts of useful things - but if it came down to it, as it did with The Tunnel, I would be capable of pulling them off. So you see, I know, and I think any overseas professional knows, that these are not ideal 'dealmaking' projects. Yet I must do them. So I suppose the ideal thing is to create an interest in my work - so even if nothing comes directly this time, people will be watching. Does that make sense? Of course, if opportunity knows, I'll never say now. This is just my relativistic and realistic take on things. 

On a more hysterical note:

I'm about to go to bed and Jacques suddenly speaks: "Jenna" he says, in a very solemn tone. "Oh no," I think, "What have I done wrong?" "Jenna," he says, "You know what we mustn't let slide while we're here? You know what we absolutely have to do?" I have no idea where he's going with this, but I hope it's good. He continues: "We must give our screener to Walter Murch." Holy mackerel, I completely forgot about that! Did I mention? Walter Murch is giving a panel here for the festival - Jacques and I are mildly obsessed with him (a close second after Werner Herzog) - we site him all the time, and practically have bracelets we wear in the edit room which say: "WWWD: What Would Walter Do?" So you can imagine this is a big deal for us. We have a whole strategy. So, in our next episode.... or it maybe the one after that as the panel is on friday....: 

WILL JACQUES AND JENNA GET THEIR SCREENER TO WALTER MURCH???

The plot thickens.....

 

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Sundancing Part 3

Posted January 24, 2010

So let's talk a little about the nature of celebrity. That is, if you want? I'll take that as a yes. So when I first found out I was going to be at Sundance, naturally I told people. And naturally, the response was often: "YOU'RE GOING TO SEE FAMOUS PEOPLE!!!" (That's what they said first, closely followed by asking what I'd be wearing and whether my parents were coming with). Duly noted, I agreed, this was most probable. But what does it mean. Oh yes, it's great to see a superhero in the flesh. But then what? I think everyone reacts in different ways, but I'll tell you what I do: I freeze up. And this is, I now realise, because of the absolute and total quandary going on in my head. It goes something like this: What should I do? Go up and speak to him/her? What will that do, no but what will it really do? In the end of the day, I'm most inclined to think nothing. It would be one in a series of hellos and goodbyes, only serving the purpose of possibly a compliment they've heard before. And for me? The vindication that I did not miss the opportunity and can go home and say 'I did not miss the opportunity.' But I think I'm happy to wait for that opportunity - I think I still optimistically believe that one day we'll get a chance to sit down and have a proper conversation - if life and work toss me that way. And then I will not miss out. But now, sometimes the poor guy just wants to watch a movie. I don't know. We saw Bill Gates. What do you say to him - I love your work?

It's a fraught issue. But still, this happened: Wanuri and I are picked up from the Broadway Cinema in Salt Lake City - the screening is great, the screen is BIG. Our driver is real nice, tells us how he wishes he could spend his life in athletic wear and play tennis. We're talking and he tells me he drove a guy called Todd Haynes to the airport. He sat exactly where I'm sitting. At this point I squealed and did a small dance - such as I was able to without causing the car to swerve in the blizzard we were driving through. So don't get me wrong, I do get excited about these things. 

But overall I'm sensing some kind of improvement in my general networking faculties. It's still hard, but I think I'm just getting into it a bit. Today I gave my screener to Michael Winterbottom's associate producer. That was fun. 

Have also finally been able to watch some movies  - so far the most rewarding and excellent thing I've seen has actually been the animated shorts program. Some beautiful work, really outstanding. Check out these trailers:

One Square Mile of Earth (Director: Jeff Drew)

Please Say Something (Director: David O Reilly)

Old Fangs (Director: Adrien Merigeau)

And while you're into some link clicking, The Tunnel has a page on the radical theauteurs.com

Need sleep. Speak soon. 

 

 

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SUNDANCING: Part 2

Posted January 23, 2010

jacques in Park City

So, I'm considering renaming these blog posts as follows:

CRAZY STUFF THAT JACQUES DID AT SUNDANCE. 

Exhibit A: We go to the premiere of New Frontiers, the Sundance program for experimental works. Jacques asks Joseph Gordon Levitt - who is presenting an interactive, social networking, web-based piece called HitRecord - if he can upload content of himself naked. As people are filming themselves right there in the room and uploading them direct to the site, Jacques suggests he could even strip down right there and then. Joseph Gordon Levitt is apparently pro - but in the end it is decided that Jacques should maybe make this recording in the comfort of his own home. What a disappointment. 

But I suppose the biggest deal, and as anyone who knows the program knows, TODAY WE PREMIERED THE FILM. I had reached a plateau of calm that morning which only comes through the absolution of total terror. But you know what - it was actually great. I don't know how accurate one can be about this, but the feeling was there, amoung the audience - the energy ebbed and flowed in all the right places - the story was playing itself out, telling itself. It was also brilliant to finally be able to watch an HDCAM projection - the best quality possible - almost like watching the film for the first time. Not to mention getting to see Pumzi and St Louis Blues. From a completely unbiased perspective (Yeah right, you're thinking, but really I'm the least biased person I think) - it works so well as a program. For so long we've been all doom and gloom about African cinema, and for the first time I looked and I saw... what did I see? Many things - a future - not only one of productivity, but one of brilliance. One which can only come from where we're from. And to have my film as a part of that - you can imagine. It kind of feels a bit like: WOO HOOOOOO!

Later on, many parties: First at the Hollywood Reporter event in honor of James Schamus. Surprisingly, enjoy myself - maybe I'm getting better at this. Get to meet Scott Macaulay, editor of this site. Luckily for me, I forget that he has produced to of the most influential films in my life's-inspiration-canon: Gummo and Julien Donkey Boy. Luckily I say, because if I had realised I may have died right then and there. So luckily. Get to say hello again to James Schamus - it's all a blur. I mean, what do you do in that situation, really - you may think you have the answer but you don't. I think I need to write it down. And maybe send it to him if I have the guts. 

More parties. Meet some cool Australian filmmakers who're here with their short. Speak to John Nein, festival programmer - who has very kind words about the film. I wish I could explain in these cases how much it means to hear the thoughts of those so immersed in film. But maybe they already know. 

Now it's almost 4am. I probably shouldn't be up this late - tomorrow is early waking up to get to the Director's Brunch which I think everyone is freaking out about. But Jacques and Laura are discussing the nights events and I can't sleep when there are whisperings going on. I'm too much of an eavesdropper maybe. No but really. Time for sleep. 

 

 

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SUNDANCING: Part 1 of potentially many

Posted January 21, 2010

Jenna

 

20/01/10
Blogging live from the untold mystique and glamour of Salt Lake City Airport! Really? Yes. Well, at least the first part. So far the most glamourous thing has been the valets from Entertainment Weekly. I'm sitting in arrivals waiting for Jacques and Laura, watching people stream off the escalators: who is that? is that a filmmaker? are they here for the same reasons as me? I feel like a fugitive, desperate for co-conspirators, on  the run. From what? Now there's a question. 
21/01/10
It's a bit later now and nothing has been smooth so far. I have tripped, fallen, been rammed with a shopping trolley, my flight has been cancelled, there's been a problem with our film print and later i will find out that Jacques has been arrested at customs.  But at least I have good boots. And hopefully a good film - and with those powers combined, well, nothing can stop us I think. 
Up in the air, watching the sun rise over the mountains and snow fields, that's when it starts to feel real - for the first time. In the gangway I burst into laughter for no reason. Later I will have a nervous breakdown and hide under all the pillows. And the next morning, Katherine will open the window and say, "It's snowing."
Yes, it's overwhelming being here - what it means and what it does to people. Tonight is the Opening Night Premiere of Howl - James Franco as Allen Ginsberg - interesting. After that the opening night party - I hate parties - I think I got my social skills from the genetic bargain bin.... but hey! Whatever. I think here the most important thing is to remember why you're here and why everyone else is here too, for that matter. It is also the same thing that makes celebreties out of ordinary citizens and large groups of people willing to sit alone in the dark: CINEMA. FILM. MOVIES. Woo hoo! 
More soon I hope. 

 

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Will Sundance Soon...

Posted January 18, 2010

Technically I had intended to write this post tomorrow - Tomorrow being the night before I leave for Park City and all that Sundance would/could bring. But really, I already know what it will be like - the hysteria and anxiety are all too familiar. I know what will be going through my head - it will be many things at once. It will be many things I didn't do and should have done. It will mainly just be - "F***! I should write a blog post!" So I thought I'd spare myself a late night tomorrow, when I most need it, and project myself into the future. Basically, pretend. And pretending is something I hope to after all, in part, make a career out of....

Left South Africa in the blazing heat. Suffered from advance home sickness. Almost burst into tears when I see Sharlton Copley on a full page spread in Empire Magazine. I must love that country to miss it before I've been left. I just hate the idea of it going on without me. I want to be there to see it all go down. Whatever 'it' may be. But maybe I just like to feel indispensable. Whatever. Now I find myself in the USA. A strange place. But its good to get out in the world, even if I find the States the least accessible in terms of inspiration. I don't dream here. But that's just me. Fair enough. It has other people to open it's secrets to. 

The past few days have seen an unexpected stream of festival invitations for The Tunnel... small or large, in a sense it doesn't matter - I've only recently grasped the concept of the festival circuit as equivalent to an international theatrical release. OK I'm not being paid, but PEOPLE ALL AROUND THE WORLD ARE GOING TO SEE MY FILM. And that is a great thing. Scary but great. So thank you festival programmers everywhere - keep inviting us. 

More surprising has been a steady stream of requests of interviews of one sort or another: Radio, print, the like. Now this is very weird for me. This is the kind of thing I've been practising, awake and asleep, pretty much as far back as I can remember. And now the questions are for real. Very scary. I even made an invitation of my own to one of my favourite film criticism blogs/magazines to come see the film at Sundance. Omigod I think they're coming. We cannot hide anymore. There is no more excuse of 'It's a student film' 'It's a South African film' 'It's her first film' - NO! Now it's more like 'I paid $10000000 to come see your film - why is it bad?'............ hopefully not literally, but I think you know what I mean, right? We're in the arena now. It's the colosseum. The lions are scratching at the gates. As my Uncle Tony says - "Play it cool".

Thank you! For the words of encouragement and kindness that have reached me wherever I have been. I appreciate it more than I can say. 

More news from the front!

Watch this space.........

And also watch 'The White Ribbon' - exceeds the hype - glory in seeing a master at work, a career of excellence at his fingertips. Michael Haneke is the boooomb!

bang!

over and out for now....

 

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Will Sundance

Posted January 12, 2010

Not too much from me recently, I know. So let's start at the beginning:

Happy New Year. I can't really believe that I've been sitting here, waxing lyrical (if not melodical) about making The Tunnel for over a year now. It's very strange. It seems a long time, but it's in fact comparatively short. Often, shorts of this size take many years to complete. Praise be to the celluloid gods. They have smiled upon us, for sure. 

The end of 2009 swept by in a blur of mild hysteria, late nights, visits to the printers, visits to the post office, multiple revisitings to printers and post office, folding of a 100 horrifically expensive flyers (thanks Mom), back pain and bankruptcy. But everything was OK, because all the hard stuff was only happening next year. Now it's this year. The back pain (I mistyped that as 'bank pain' - an all too accurate slip) continues, and the hysteria now ceases to be mild. It's all happening..... *counts on fingers*.... next weeek oh holy....

Advice has flooded in from various well meaning friends, family and colleagues. 

Gordon, my erstwhile boss, says: "Jenna, no matter what you do, you have to stop saying 'like' all the time. It sounds terrible. All the film people will think you're stupid." 

David says: "Don’t do the ‘Oh it’s crap, it could have been better, everyone hates me thing!!'".

Mom says: "Just stop biting your finger nails"

Rafiki from The Lion King says: "Remember who you are."... oh, but he was talking to Simba there, not me. Aw. 

I'm still new to this game, and it's quite like learning the rules as you go along (I don't like those kinds of games - they're harder to win) - It's all very alien - like booking my first ever radio interview. Publicity.....oh no, one of the waves of madness is coming over me again - they generally take the form of obsessive internet research (because yes it is absolutely vital that I memorize the IMdb credentials of EVERYONE who will be attending the festival. obviously, I mean, who wouldn't) or just paralysing neuroses about everything I won't have managed to do by the time I leave on Thursday. Like business cards. Oh no....

None of this is very helpful, i know. So I'll sign off with some thoughts I had on Avatar. Because it seems everyone has thoughts. And this way I might not get into any real life fights with people. Maybe just cyber ones.... 

OK, so first you'll have to travel back with me to a few weeks ago when I first saw the thing:

Alright, so I've just left the cinema after seeing the movie that seems to have put that 3D glint in everyone's eye. Yes, Avatar. Yes. What I think of the film overall is still in the mix, but I think it's indicative that I felt compelled to put down a few thoughts. Because it definitely did make me think:

So at first I'm watching this movie, and while here and there there are some very interesting departures, for all intents and purposes it seems to be the lurching blockbuster beast, dripping dollars and cynicism (and at times astonishing naivety) from every celluloid pore and sprocket. But the good parts win out, at least to the point where I was primarily involved with it, only reminded by the gratingly commercial theme song at the end what I was watching: A myth for sale (a wonderful term coined by James Schamus which I enjoy very much and hope to use over and over until I can create my own insightful terminology). And yet, this is not a myth, at least, it is far too close to home and it's implications far too modern: The parallels with colonialism and imperialism in the film have already been noted by those much more qualified than I, but I for one was thoroughly unnerved by them. I shifted uneasily in my seat, wondering if anyone else was disturbed by it. Because disturbed we should be: Here is a blockbuster film, the epitome of the corporation (one would like to think not, but they are most often, the mouth piece as it were), telling me how terrible the Western oppressor is. For shame? perhaps. What made me even more uncomfortable, was that this was an imperialist based narrative with a happy ending: Here the savages (I only use that term because that is undoubtedly how they are portrayed) win, thanks to Mother Nature stepping in: Alright for some, but historically, the greater forces of our world, be they as they may, have turned the other cheek, or their back, depending on how you look at it. There is no happy ending to our hatred and greed. It least on our planet. 
But stepping back, or rather back into, the world of the film, yes whether you see it as sci-fi or fantasy (I heartily nominate the latter), if we put aside our worldly concerns (can we afford to? A debate for another time), the imagination at work here enthralls, at least for a time. Basically, there are two kinds of good movies: Those that allow us to leave the cinema enthralled with our own world, in love with it, embracing the air and seeing with new eyes. And there are those that push us out reluctantly, frustrated with our lives and their limitations, now that we have been allowed a privileged glimpse of an alternative world. Whichever you prefer, I think I can sum up which one Avatar is in the words of James Stent, who I work with - "Real life sucks". And yes I often agree - not only because in this world I cannot fly past floating moss covered mountains. But more profoundly because in this world we cannot unite to save ourselves and our planet. 

So those were my two cents, and I hereby toss them into the collective opinion pool - I hope my wish comes true. 

 

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