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Made in Brooklyn: A Slide show of films about Brooklyn

Posted October 05, 2010 to photo album "Made in Brooklyn: A Slide show of films about Brooklyn"

For directors Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden, filming It’s Kind of a Funny Story in Brooklyn was essential to the story. It was a choice many filmmakers before them made as well.

Made in Brooklyn | Pariah
Fatty at Coney Island (1917) | Coney Island
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (1945)  | Williamsburg
It Happened in Brooklyn (1947) | Bensonhurst
On the Town (1949) | Brooklyn Navy Yards
Little Fugitive (1953) | Coney Island
The French Connection (1971) | New Utrecht Avenue & others
Dog Day Afternoon (1975) | Gravesend
Saturday Night Fever (1977) | Bay Ridge
The Warriors (1979) | Coney Island & others
Sophie's Choice (1982) | Flatbush
Moonstruck (1987) | Carroll Gardens & Park Slope
Do the Right Thing (1989) | Bedford-Stuyvesant
Little Odessa (1994) | Brighton Beach
Smoke / Blue in the Face (1995) | Park Slope
The Squid and the Whale (2005) | Park Slope
Half Nelson (2006) | Red Hook
The Squid and the Whale (2005) | Park Slope

The Squid and the Whale (2005) | Park Slope

In Greenberg, writer-director Noah Baumbach captured with loving detail the complexity of Los Angles, which had recently become the his new home. Five years earlier, Baumbach’s The Squid and the Whale immersed itself into the geography and culture of his childhood home, Brooklyn. The tale of two brothers (Jesse Eisenberg and Owen Kline) dealing with the divorce of their parents (Jeff Daniels and Laura Linney) is both a universal tale and an almost anthropological look at a very specific Brooklyn species––urban intellectuals. It is no small wonder that the film’s central metaphor and title come from the Museum of Natural History. And although that diorama is in a Manhattan museum, most of the action takes place in Park Slope. Says Baumbach, “I love Brooklyn. I have so many memories; I had to shoot there. It’s like using my dad’s clothes…being on the streets where I spent years of my childhood definitely stirred up stuff. I loved growing up there and some of my closest friends are people that grew up across the street or around the block. But then there was always the side that if you could live in Manhattan you would live in Manhattan. Nobody would ever really choose to live in Brooklyn…it’s always the second choice….”