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People in Film | Patricia Clarkson

Posted June 17, 2011 to photo album "People in Film | Patricia Clarkson"

The New Orleans-born actress finds a way to make every film she’s in better.

Patricia Clarkson: An Essential Character
Between New Orleans and New York
For Yale And Theater
Character Actor And Beyond
The Queen of Sundance
Big Films, Small Films, Character Part, Film Star
The Queen of Sundance

The Queen of Sundance

From High Art, Clarkson established herself as one of America’s most distinctive actress. In 2001, she received an Emmy for her memorable work on the HBO series “Six Feet Under”, and the next year she was presented a New York Film Critics Circle award, as well as the National Society of Film Critics award, for her turn as the gossipy neighbor in Todd Haynes' sumptuous period piece Far From Heaven. Then in 2003, she became the unofficial Queen of Sundance, starring in a record four features at that year’s Sundance Film Festival: Thomas McCarthy’s The Station Agent, Peter Hedges’ Pieces of April, David Gordon Green’s All The Real Girls, and Michael MacKenzie’s The Pig and The Baroness. Even the Sundance Film festival attempted to make her title semi-official by presenting her with a special Jury Award that year. Her work in Pieces of April brought her further recognition the next year when she was nominated for best supporting actress for her part as the chronically ill mother. And while it was an ensemble piece, The Washington Post’s Ann Hornaday declared, “Pieces of April belongs, wholly and completely, to Clarkson, who delivers Joy's mordant asides and withering observations with a flawless balance of tartness and vulnerability.”