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The Hunt for Nazis: The Real-Life Captures That Inspired The Debt

Posted August 22, 2011 to photo album "The Hunt for Nazis: The Real-Life Captures That Inspired The Debt"

John Madden’s THE DEBT tells the tale of a trio of Mossad agents who hunted down a wanted Nazi war criminal. We explore the stories of the many real-life Nazi war criminals who went into hiding after the war, and the people who tracked them down to bring them to justice.

The Debt's Hunt for Nazi Criminals
Nazi War Criminals After the War
Adolf Eichmann, the Transportation Administrator
Capturing Eichmann
Josef Mengele, the
Mengele's Escape
Martin Bormann, Hitler's Private Secretary
The Hunt for Martin Bormann
Martin Bormann's Death
Barbie's Hunters
The Trial of Klaus Barbie
Aribert Ferdinand Heim,
Erich Rajakowitsch
Franz Paul Stangl,
Hermine Braunsteiner Ryan
Herberts Cukurs
Dinko Šakić
The Hunt for Martin Bormann

The Hunt for Martin Bormann

Bormann’s “Wanted” poster

Bormann was last seen on May 1, 1945, trying to get out of Berlin. Whether he was killed that day or he escaped is unknown. Bormann’s chauffeur, Jakob Glas, insisted that he saw Bormann in Munich weeks after May 1. Bormann was tried in absentia by the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg in October 1946, who sentenced him to death. A cottage industry has arisen to make the case that Bormann survived. Bormann sightings were reported in Europe and South America, particularly in Paraguay. But none were confirmed. Some claimed that he had plastic surgery. Another story has it that with the help of German industrialists he set up a network of shadow companies in which to launder Nazi wealth. Then there is the theory that Bormann lived his remaining years in Moscow, as a retired Soviet spy.