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L.A. from Every Angle

Posted April 01, 2010 to photo album "L.A. from Every Angle"

As Noah Baumbach’s Greenberg shows, there are many different L.A.s inside the city limits. Joel Bleifuss takes us on the tour of how artists imagine Los Angeles.

Slide 1: Greenberg and Baumbach at Musso & Frank
Slide 2: L.A. for Hollywood
Slide 3: L.A. for Native Americans
Slide 4: L.A. for Silent Filmmakers
Slide 5:  L.A. for Californios
Slide 6: L.A. for the Muralists
Slide 7:  L.A. against the Communist Muralists
Slide 8: L.A. for the Muralists Again
Slide 9: L.A. for the Hard-Boiled
Slide 10: L.A. of the Film Noir
Slide 11: L.A. of the Cynics
Slide 12: L.A. of the Desperate
Slide 13: L.A. for the Dreamers
Slide 14: L.A. for the Modernists
Slide 15: L.A. for the Doers
Slide 16: L.A. for the Hustlers
Slide 17: L.A. of the Painters
Slide 18: L.A. of the Logo
Slide 19:  L.A. of the new Artists
Slide 20: L.A. of the Mexican-American Writers
Slide 21: L.A. of the Singer/Songwriters
Slide 22:  L.A. of Lowlifes
Slide 23: L.A. of the Essay Writers
Slide 24: L.A. of Gay Detectives
Slide 25: L.A. for Rock ’n’ Rollers
Slide 26: L.A. of the Privileged
Slide 27: L.A. of the Cholos
Slide 28: L.A. of the Gangstas
Slide 29: L.A. for the children of the rich and famous
Slide 30: L.A. for the children of the rich and famous, Part 2
Slide 9: L.A. for the Hard-Boiled

Slide 9: L.A. for the Hard-Boiled

Raymond Chandler (1888-1959). Though born in Chicago and raised in England, Chandler would become L.A.’s most famous novelist. His detective stories give life to the world of Los Angeles, a city that he described – speaking through his private dick, Philip Marlowe – as “lost and beaten and full of emptiness”, “a neon-lighted slum” and a city “with no more personality than a paper cup.”

Chandler’s biographer Frank MacShane writes in The Life of Raymond Chandler, “There is something appropriate in Chandler’s choosing the detective story as his vehicle for presenting Los Angeles. ...The detective story, so peculiar to the modern city, can involve an extraordinary range of humanity, from the very rich to the very poor, and can encompass a great many different places. Most of Chandler’s contemporaries who wrote ‘straight’ fiction—Fitzgerald, Hemingway and Faulkner, for example—confined themselves to a special setting and a limited cast of characters. The detective story, however, allowed Chandler to create the whole of Los Angeles in much the same way that such 19th-Century novelists as Dickens and Balzac created London and Paris for future generations.”