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Great Babies of History

Posted April 09, 2010 to photo album "Great Babies of History"

With Babies in theaters, we take look back on some of the most memorable babies of all time.

Slide 1: Introduction - Great Babies of History
Slide 2: The Child of God - The Baby Jesus
Slide 3: The Children of Empire - Romulus and Remus
Slide 4: Child of Hope - Keith Haring's Radiant Baby
Slide 5: Child of Commerce - The Gerber Baby
Slide 6: Child of Legend - Hercules
Slide 7: Child of Fantasy - Mowgli
Slide 8: Child of Power - Bronzino’s Portrait of Giovanni de' Medici
Slide 9: Child of Racism - Tar baby
Slide 10: Child of Cinema - The baby in Rescued from an Eagle Nest
Slide 11: Child of Capitalism - Baby Herman
Slide 12: Child of Comics - Swee'Pea
Slide 13: Child of Crime - The Lindbergh baby
Slide 14: Child of Horror - The It's Alive baby
Slide 15: Child of Persistence - Baby Huey
Slide 16: Children of Television - Rugrats
Slide 17: Child of the Coen brothers - Junior from Raising Arizona
Slide 18: Child of Satan - Rosemary's Baby
Slide 9: Child of Racism - Tar baby

Slide 9: Child of Racism - Tar baby

The Tar-baby was born in Joel Chandler Harris’ 19th century tales of Uncle Remus, who describes how Br’er Fox created the critter to ensnare Br’er Rabbit: “Brer Fox went ter wuk en got 'imsome tar, en mix it wid some turkentime, en fix up a contrapshun w'at he call a Tar-Baby.” He laid the “baby” by the road hoping Br’er Rabbit would get stuck when he picked it up. In 1946, when Walt Disney decided to adapt Harris’ stories into their animated epic Song of the South, Tar-Baby became a point of controversy, since the term was also used as racial slur. Years later, the novelist Toni Morrison tried to redeem the poor thing, using it as the tile of a book: “Tar Baby is also a name, like 'nigger,' that white people call black children, black girls, as I recall…. At one time, a tar pit was a holy place, at least an important place, because tar was used to build things…. It held together things like Moses' little boat and the pyramids. For me, the tar baby came to mean the black woman who can hold things together."