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All in the Family: A family slide show album from Away We Go to anything goes

Posted June 12, 2009 to photo album "All in the Family: A family slide show album from Away We Go to anything goes"

Slide 1: The Journey Begins
Slide 2: But what is a family?
Slide 3: First Comes Marriage
Slide 4: Family as an evolving idea
Slide 5: Early Family Values
Slide 6: Family as Contract
Slide 7: Family as units of labor
Slide 8: Tragic Love
Slide 10: Family as an evolving idea
Slide 10: The power of “opposite marriage”
Slide 11: The Nuclear Family in the Atomic Age
Slide 12: Learning to be a Parent
Slide 13: A Parent Superiority
Slide 14: Making the Breast of being a Parent
Slide 15: Not Every Mother
Slide 16: Keeping the promise of marriage
Slide 17: Big(amy) Love
Slide 18: The Rules of the Game
Slide 19: Marriage loses momentum
Slide 20: Eight is Enough
Slide 21: Showing off your Family
Slide 22: Family as Adventure
Slide 23: Going it Alone
Slide 24: Every Family Different in its own way
Slide 25: The Family Triangle
Slide 26: All You Need is...
Slide 7: Family as units of labor

Slide 7: Family as units of labor

But the development of the middle-class nuclear family was not a boon to the poor. Stephanie Coontz, in her book The Way We Never Were: American Familes and the Nostalgia Trap (1992) wrote: “For every nineteenth-century middle-class family that protected its wife and child within the family circle, there was an Irish or a German girl scrubbing floors in that home, a Welsh boy mining coal to keep the home-baked goodies warm, a black girl doing the family laundry, a black mother and child picking cotton to be made into clothes for the family, and a Jewish or an Italian daughter in a sweatshop making ‘ladies’ dresses or artificial flowers for the family to purchase.” In this 1911 photograph by Lewis Hines, boys toil at the Pennsylvania Coal Company in South Pittston, Pa. Hines, a sociologist and photographer, wrote, “The dust was so dense at times as to obscure the view. This dust penetrated the utmost recesses of the boys' lungs. A kind of slave-driver sometimes stands over the boys, prodding or kicking them into obedience.”