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Sin Nombre's Terrifying Political Reality

Posted March 27, 2009 to photo album "Sin Nombre's Terrifying Political Reality"

Slide 1: The world of Sin Nombre
Slide 2: The State of Mexico
Slide 3: Between the USA and Central America
Slide 4: The Border Issue
Slide 5: "A very big monster"
Slide 6: Fighting Back
Slide 7: No Place to Go
Slide 8: The Fate of the Poor
Slide 9: A History of Poverty
Slide 10: A History of Violence
Slide 11: Honduras and Others
Slide 12: Gang Violence
Slide 13: More Gang Violence
Slide 14: A Cycle of Violence
Slide 15: Empty Mexican Towns
Slide 16: What Their Eyes Have Seen
Slide 5: "A very big monster"

Slide 5: "A very big monster"

Hundreds of Central American migrants ride atop freight trains leaving Arriaga, Mexico en route to the United States. Among other dangers, many have lost limbs as a result of falling onto the tracks below. (By Carlos Bartolo Solis, Hogar de la Misericordia, www.migrantearriaga.org.mx)

Like in Sin Nombre, many Central American migrants ride the rails north. Just how many was made clear in July 2007, when the Connecticut-based rail company Genessee and Wyoming Inc. stopped operations. As a result more, than 2,500 Central American migrants camped for weeks along the tracks in Tenosique, in the state of Tabasco, waiting for a train that would not arrive. Some gave up and began walking the 200 miles north to the next rail terminus.

Francisco Aceves, who coordinates Grupo Beta, a Mexican government agency that helps migrants, says that corrupt officials are the biggest obstacle that migrants face. The group hands out pamphlets that tell Central Americans how to avoid extortion. He told the Christian Science Monitor, "We are working against a very big monster."