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L.A. from Every Angle

Posted April 01, 2010 to photo album "L.A. from Every Angle"

As Noah Baumbach’s Greenberg shows, there are many different L.A.s inside the city limits. Joel Bleifuss takes us on the tour of how artists imagine Los Angeles.

Slide 1: Greenberg and Baumbach at Musso & Frank
Slide 2: L.A. for Hollywood
Slide 3: L.A. for Native Americans
Slide 4: L.A. for Silent Filmmakers
Slide 5:  L.A. for Californios
Slide 6: L.A. for the Muralists
Slide 7:  L.A. against the Communist Muralists
Slide 8: L.A. for the Muralists Again
Slide 9: L.A. for the Hard-Boiled
Slide 10: L.A. of the Film Noir
Slide 11: L.A. of the Cynics
Slide 12: L.A. of the Desperate
Slide 13: L.A. for the Dreamers
Slide 14: L.A. for the Modernists
Slide 15: L.A. for the Doers
Slide 16: L.A. for the Hustlers
Slide 17: L.A. of the Painters
Slide 18: L.A. of the Logo
Slide 19:  L.A. of the new Artists
Slide 20: L.A. of the Mexican-American Writers
Slide 21: L.A. of the Singer/Songwriters
Slide 22:  L.A. of Lowlifes
Slide 23: L.A. of the Essay Writers
Slide 24: L.A. of Gay Detectives
Slide 25: L.A. for Rock ’n’ Rollers
Slide 26: L.A. of the Privileged
Slide 27: L.A. of the Cholos
Slide 28: L.A. of the Gangstas
Slide 29: L.A. for the children of the rich and famous
Slide 30: L.A. for the children of the rich and famous, Part 2
Slide 5:  L.A. for Californios

Slide 5: L.A. for Californios

Manue la Garcia (1869-?) was a “Californio,” one of the people whose families settled what was once known as Alta California. Garcia “grew up in a household that sometimes included the influential Spanish-born guitarist Miguel Arévalo, who had moved to Los Angeles in 1871 and formed the Los Angeles Musical Association.

In 1903, the Los Angeles-born Garcia, an accomplished singer, recorded 107 songs for Charles Lummis. With the help of an Edison wax cylinder recording machine, Lummis was able to “catch our archaeology alive” and collect the songs of the Californios.

Vykki Mende Gray, a musician who is a descendent of Californios, writes on LosCalifornios.com, “The land was called Alta California, the time was the heyday of the California missions and ranchos from the 1770s through the 1860s (more or less), and the people called themselves Californios. Travelers to the area were consistently impressed by the secular music and the social dances, commenting often on the propensity of the Californios to dance and sing—and particularly at times when the largely Protestant observers thought they ought not to.”