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L.A. from Every Angle

Posted April 01, 2010 to photo album "L.A. from Every Angle"

As Noah Baumbach’s Greenberg shows, there are many different L.A.s inside the city limits. Joel Bleifuss takes us on the tour of how artists imagine Los Angeles.

Slide 1: Greenberg and Baumbach at Musso & Frank
Slide 2: L.A. for Hollywood
Slide 3: L.A. for Native Americans
Slide 4: L.A. for Silent Filmmakers
Slide 5:  L.A. for Californios
Slide 6: L.A. for the Muralists
Slide 7:  L.A. against the Communist Muralists
Slide 8: L.A. for the Muralists Again
Slide 9: L.A. for the Hard-Boiled
Slide 10: L.A. of the Film Noir
Slide 11: L.A. of the Cynics
Slide 12: L.A. of the Desperate
Slide 13: L.A. for the Dreamers
Slide 14: L.A. for the Modernists
Slide 15: L.A. for the Doers
Slide 16: L.A. for the Hustlers
Slide 17: L.A. of the Painters
Slide 18: L.A. of the Logo
Slide 19:  L.A. of the new Artists
Slide 20: L.A. of the Mexican-American Writers
Slide 21: L.A. of the Singer/Songwriters
Slide 22:  L.A. of Lowlifes
Slide 23: L.A. of the Essay Writers
Slide 24: L.A. of Gay Detectives
Slide 25: L.A. for Rock ’n’ Rollers
Slide 26: L.A. of the Privileged
Slide 27: L.A. of the Cholos
Slide 28: L.A. of the Gangstas
Slide 29: L.A. for the children of the rich and famous
Slide 30: L.A. for the children of the rich and famous, Part 2
Slide 3: L.A. for Native Americans

Slide 3: L.A. for Native Americans

Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-1885) was one of the earliest champions of Native American rights. She is most famous as the author of Ramona, a novel whose heroine is half-Scottish, half-Indian, about discrimination against the Payomkowishum Indians (also known as the Luiseño Indians) of Southern California.

A bestseller when it was published in 1884, the novel fueled a boom in what is known as “Ramona tourism,” with visitors coming west on the just-completed Southern Pacific Railroad. (The part of Interstate 10 that runs past L.A.’s Union Station was originally named Ramona Freeway.) 

In 1886, the North American Review called Ramona “unquestionably the best novel yet produced by an American woman,” and deemed it one of the two most ethical 19th century novels, the other being Uncle Tom’s Cabin. “If I can do one-hundredth part for the Indian that Mrs. Stowe did for the Negro, I will be thankful,” Hunt Jackson told a friend.