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All in the Family: A family slide show album from Away We Go to anything goes

Posted June 12, 2009 to photo album "All in the Family: A family slide show album from Away We Go to anything goes"

Slide 1: The Journey Begins
Slide 2: But what is a family?
Slide 3: First Comes Marriage
Slide 4: Family as an evolving idea
Slide 5: Early Family Values
Slide 6: Family as Contract
Slide 7: Family as units of labor
Slide 8: Tragic Love
Slide 10: Family as an evolving idea
Slide 10: The power of “opposite marriage”
Slide 11: The Nuclear Family in the Atomic Age
Slide 12: Learning to be a Parent
Slide 13: A Parent Superiority
Slide 14: Making the Breast of being a Parent
Slide 15: Not Every Mother
Slide 16: Keeping the promise of marriage
Slide 17: Big(amy) Love
Slide 18: The Rules of the Game
Slide 19: Marriage loses momentum
Slide 20: Eight is Enough
Slide 21: Showing off your Family
Slide 22: Family as Adventure
Slide 23: Going it Alone
Slide 24: Every Family Different in its own way
Slide 25: The Family Triangle
Slide 26: All You Need is...
Slide 18: The Rules of the Game

Slide 18: The Rules of the Game

But at the end of the 19th century, the state began to strictly regulate who could be marriage and who could not. Writing in the New York Times, Coontz, a professor at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash., observes: “By the 1920s, 38 states prohibited whites from marrying blacks, mulattos, Japanese, Chinese, Indians, Mongolians, Malays or Filipinos. Twelve states would not issue a marriage license if one partner was a drunk, an addict or a mental defect. Eighteen states set barriers to remarriage after divorce. In the mid-20th century, governments began to get out of the business of deciding which couples were fit to marry. Courts invalidated laws against interracial marriage, struck down other barriers and even extended marriage rights to prisoners.”