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The Years of the Berlin Film Festival

Posted February 11, 2010 to photo album "The Years of the Berlin Film Festival"

The Berlinale turns 60 this year. What a strange journey it’s been.

Slide 1: 2010 - The Berlin Film Festival
Slide 2: 1951 - The Festival Starts
Slide 3: 1955 - Germany Steps Up
Slide 4: 1958 - The Festival Opens Up
Slide 5: 1961 - A Cultural Divide
Slide 6: 1965 - Different Programs
Slide 7: 1971 - Starting All Over Again
Slide 8: 1974 - Cold War Thaws
Slide 9: 1978 - A New Director, a New Date
Slide 10: 1979 - International Conflict
Slide 11: 1982 - Germany Divided
Slide 12: 1987 - The East Comes West
Slide 13: 1990 - A New Berlin
Slide 14: 1996 - The Festival at Full Tilt
Slide 15: 2000 - An Anniversary and new Home.
Slide 16: 2004 - A Different Type Of German Film
Slide 17: 2006 - An International Duty
Slide 15: 2000 - An Anniversary and new Home.

Slide 15: 2000 - An Anniversary and new Home.

The festival’s new home at the Potsdamer Platz.

On the occasion of its 50th year, the festival gave itself a magnificent present – a new home on Potsdamer Platz. In addition to the theaters that would screen most of the festivals films, the area housed the European Film Market, the Berlin Film Museum, and other institutions of Berlin’s cinema world. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia won the Golden Bear, but it was one of the few stand-out films. Indeed the festival’s new digs was unfortunately not celebrated with remarkable films. As Katja Nicodemus observed in Die Tageszeitung, “What was missing in the Competition were films with the class of Almodóvar, Loach, Tarantino or the Dogma school, which could make up for the emptiness of the mainstream with their world view, their concerns, their commitment.”