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Rome, the Eternal Story: From Ben Hur to The Eagle

Posted January 21, 2011 to photo album "Rome, the Eternal Story: From Ben Hur to The Eagle"

The Eagle explores a part of ancient Roman history rarely seen on stage. But the history of Rome changes throughout history as well.

Slide 1: Exploring New Territory
Slide 2: Rome - The Eternal, Ever-Changing City
Slide 3: Rome and the American Imagination
Slide 4: Ben Hur, the great American/Roman Novel
Slide 5: Ben Hur (1907) in Silent Film
Slide 6: Ben-Hur (1925) and the Epic Grandeur of Rome
Slide 7: Scipio Africanus: The Defeat of  Hannibal and the Fascist Italy
Slide 8: Quo Vadis - Nero’s Rome as a Totalitarian State
Slide 9: Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1959) and the Race to Freedom
Slide 10: Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ (1959) and Making Rome Gay
Slide 11: Spartacus (1960) and the Return of the Opressed
Slide 12: Cleopatra and American Excess
Slide 13: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum: Rome turned Jewish
Slide 14: Satryicon (1969), Ancient Rome through Fellini’s Eyes
Slide 15: Caligula (1979): Rome Goes All The Way
Slide 16: Monty Python’s The Life of Brian - Rome as Parody
Slide 16: Gladiator (2000), and the Return of Rome
Slide 14: Satryicon (1969), Ancient Rome through Fellini’s Eyes

Slide 14: Satryicon (1969), Ancient Rome through Fellini’s Eyes

Federico Fellini has never fully explained what he was trying to do with Satryicon, a film based, sort of, on the work of the Roman author Petronius Arbiter, and for which he received an Academy award nomination for best director. He once said he was trying to make an analogy between ancient Rome and contemporary society. At another time, he described his film as: “A voyage into total obscurity! An unknown planet for me to populate!” And, taking another tack, he said: “From a pre-Christian to a post-Christian one: Christ has disappeared and we've got to get along without him. This is the relevance of the film to today.” Critic Carl J. Mora writes that the film “reflects Italy's postwar status-no longer a country with imperial or military aspirations but a more prosperous society in which Fellini discerns moral and spiritual decay.”