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People in Film | Cary Fukunaga

Posted January 11, 2011 to photo album "People in Film | Cary Fukunaga"

Get to know Cary Fukunaga, the acclaimed director of Focus Features’ Jane Eyre and Sin Nombre.

Cary Fukunaga | Beginnings
Cary Fukunaga | The Sundance Labs
Cary Fukunaga | Sin Nombre
Cary Fukunaga | Commercials and Cinematography
Cary Fukunaga | Jane Eyre
Cary Fukunaga | Jane Eyre

Cary Fukunaga | Jane Eyre

For his follow-up to Sin Nombre, Cary Fukuna has chosen unexpected source material. Traveling far from the world of Mexican gangs and illegal immigrants, Fukunaga is journeying to a country estate in 19th Century England. His adaptation of Charlotte Brontë 's Jane Eyre opens from Focus Features in spring 2011. But, listening to Fukunaga — and watching the film's intense trailer — it's clear that the film isn't the change-up it might seem. In an interview with Movieline, Fukunaga discussed what drew him to the project. "I’d known there was a Jane Eyre script out there for a couple of years, and [the Robert Stevenson-directed 1944 version] was one of my favorite movies as a kid,” Fukunaga said. “When [Sin Nombre] came out in the UK, I took advantage of that to meet with the BBC, and it turned out that there was no director that was attached anymore and the script happened to be amazing.” The film stars Mia Wasikowska, Michael Fassbender and Dame Judi Dench, and Fukunaga says that, like Sin Nombre, it's informed by history and detail. "I’m a stickler for raw authenticity," he told Movieline, "so I’ve spent a lot of time rereading the book and trying to feel out what Charlotte Brontë was feeling when she was writing it. That sort of spookiness that plagues the entire story… it’s very rare that you see those sorts of darker sides [in the other adaptations]. They treat it like it’s just a period romance, and I think it’s much more than that.”