withSticker_cropped

About FocusFeatures.com

Hi, I'm here to help. I'm keeping my eye on the blogs and message boards. I would love to hear what you think about the site and try to address any problems you may be having.

More About FocusFeatures.com »

To leave a message for administrator, login or register below.

Login | Register

Archives

Member Profile | FocusFeatures.com

Robert Mitchum: Prisoner # 91234

Updated September 30, 2009

61 years after Mitchum was released from jail, Faber & Faber examines the star’s marijuana bust with the help of Lee Server’s book, Robert Mitchum: "Baby, I Don't Care."

Robert Mitchum
Robert Mitchum

Robert Mitchum

Mitchum kicks back in the joint

 

 

 

Arthur Penn: "The American Truffaut"

Updated September 25, 2009

Faber and Faber’s Walter Donohue marks director Arthur Penn’s 87th birthday by looking back at his creative contributions to the iconic Bonnie and Clyde.

Penn, Beatty and Dunaway
Dunaway and Penn
Penn, Beatty and Dunaway

Penn, Beatty and Dunaway

Arthur Penn with Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway on the set of Bonnie and Clyde.

 

 

 

A Serious Man NYC Premiere

Updated September 25, 2009

The new Coen brothers movie had its gala premiere at the historic Ziegfeld Theatre as part of the Friars Club Comedy Festival, and FilmInFocus was there to shoot the action.

Slide 1: The Actor in Profile
Slide 2: Serious Smiles
Slide 3: The Coens in Focus
Slide 4: Is That a Dybbuk?
Slide 5: Dapper As Ever
Slide 6: Sam the Man
Slide 7: Seeing A New Side to Mrs. Gopnik
Slide 1: The Actor in Profile

Slide 1: The Actor in Profile

The serious man himself, Michael Stuhlbarg, on the red carpet at the Ziegfeld Theatre, which held the gala premiere of the Coen’s movie for the Friars Club Comedy Festival.

 

 

 

Rodrigo Perez of The Playlist

Updated September 24, 2009

The New York City-based curator of the excellent music-themed film blog gives an insight into what makes his site tick.

Rodrigo Perez
The Playlist
Rodrigo Perez

Rodrigo Perez

Rodrigo Perez

 

 

 

Five Jewish Films of the 1970s

Updated September 22, 2009

To coincide with the upcoming release of A Serious Man, novelist and short story writer Nathan Englander picks his favorite Jewish films of the 1970s.

Nathan Englander
Nathan Englander

Nathan Englander

Nathan Englander

 

 

 

Carter Burwell on A Serious Man's score

Updated September 21, 2009

The Coen brothers’ regular composer, Carter Burwell, talks about writing the music for their new film, A Serious Man.

Michael Stulhbarg in A Serious Man
Carter Burwell at his piano
Michael Stulhbarg in A Serious Man

Michael Stulhbarg in A Serious Man

Michael Stulhbarg in A Serious Man

 

 

 

DJs on Film

Updated September 18, 2009

To mark the forthcoming release of Focus Features’ Pirate Radio, Nick Dawson presents a comprehensive look at how the movies see disc jockeys.

Philip Seymour Hoffman
DJ Super Soul
Janeane Garofalo as Abby
Stephen McHattie
Don Cheadle as Ralph
Robin Williams with Sandra Oh
Philip Seymour Hoffman

Philip Seymour Hoffman

Philip Seymour Hoffman in Pirate Radio

 

 

 

Ahoy, Pirate Radio

Updated September 18, 2009

In Richard Curtis’ comedy Pirate Radio, rock’n’roll in Britain was beamed from ships illegally transmitting in the 1960s. But there’s more than meets the ear here according to Simon Frith.

The Caroline ship
Rhys Ifans
Boat groupies
Ronan O'Rahilly
Radio Invincta DJ Booth
The Caroline ship

The Caroline ship

The Caroline ship

 

 

 

13 Ways of Looking at Philip Seymour Hoffman

Updated September 18, 2009

From Boogie Nights to Pirate Radio, Hoffman’s body of work never loses sight of his body.

Slide 1: Introduction
Slide 2: The Pathetic Loser (Boogie Nights)
Slide 3: The Perv (Happiness)
Slide 4: The Officious Extra (The Big Lebowski)
Slide 5: The Ringmaster (The Talented Mr. Ripley)
Slide 6: The Insider's Outsider (Almost Famous)
Slide 7: The Designated Mourner (Love Liza)
Slide 8: The Sincere Dandy (Capote)
Slide 9: The Banality of Evil (Mission: Impossible III)
Slide 10: The Charming Heavy (Before the Devil Knows You're Dead)
Slide 11: Macho Bastard (Charlie Wilson's War)
Slide 12: The Contender (Doubt)
Slide 13: Pillar of His Own World (Synecdoche, New York)
Slide 14: The Rock 'n' Roller (Pirate Radio)
Slide 1: Introduction

Slide 1: Introduction

Without question, Philip Seymour Hoffman rates as one of America’s finest actors. His work as a character actor in some ways has completely redefined that often maligned category. Unlike many actors who use costume and make up to transform themselves into other people, Hoffman appears fairly similar from role to role. And while some actors who gain or drop 50 pounds from role to role, Hoffman’s body––slightly over-weight, sometimes slovenly and he readily admits not the most attractive––rarely changes. Hoffman’s transformations are purely internal, a refocusing of psychic energy on his malleable bulk to create something new with each film. Without barely of ounce of weight shed, or the plucking of single eyebrow, Hoffman shifts our perspective, turning the loser of his earlier films to the fierce alpha male of recent movies.

 

 

 

Irving Thalberg: Hollywood's Boy Wonder

Updated September 15, 2009

Faber & Faber’s Walter Donohue marks the anniversary of Irving Thalberg’s death in 1936 by dipping into Thomas Schatz’s The Genius of The System: Hollywood Film-making in the Studio Era.

Irving Thalberg
Thalberg and Shearer
Irving Thalberg

Irving Thalberg

A common sight: Thalberg at his desk.