A look back at this day in film history
November 26
YCTIWY August 23, 1938
You Can't Take It With You Premieres

Frank Capra's remarkable run of smart, successful 1930s comedies continued with You Can't Take It With You, which had its premiere on this day in 1938. The movie was an adaptation of George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's hit play of the same name, which was still in its initial run at the Booth Theatre in New York City when Capra's screen version was released, an impressive two years-plus after its debut performance on Broadway. A lively comedy about a love affair between a spoiled millionaire banker's son, Tony Kirby, and Alice Sycamore, a girl from a family whose house is full of oddball types who have left the rat race in order to follow their (often whimsical) dreams, the play was surprisingly provocative in its politics – many of the characters in the Sycamore residence could be described as anarchists or communists, with the patriarch Martin Vanderhof famously speaking out against paying taxes. Capra saw the Pulitzer Prize-winning play when his film Lost Horizon premiered in NYC in 1937, and although Columbia president Harry Cohn balked at the price of $200,000 he would have to pay for the screen rights, he agreed to stump up the cash – on the condition that Capra dropped a lawsuit against him for having falsely promoting the 1935 Jean Arthur vehicle If You Could Only Cook as a Capra movie. Capra assembled a great cast – Jean Arthur and James Stewart as the lovebirds, Lionel Barrymore as Martin Vanderhof, with Edward Arnold, Mischa Auer, Spring Byington, Ann Miller, Donald Meek and H.B. Warner in support – while Capra's regular screenwriter Robert Riskin turned in a sterling script. And though Cohn set up the film for Capra with gritted teeth, it all panned out in the end: You Can't Take It With You received excellent reviews, won Best Picture and Best Director at the 1938 Academy Awards, and earned over $5 million worldwide. The movie also marked the beginning of the fruitful partnership between Capra and Stewart that would continue with Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) and It's a Wonderful Life (1946).

More Flashbacks
Casablanca November 26, 1942
Casablanca released

In New York City, stars, including Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, gathered for the premiere of Casablanca.

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November 26, 1993
Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould released

Few knew what to expect from a film called Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould when it opened in New York.

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November 26, 1993
A Life in Fragments

In the same month and year that Jane Campion’s The Piano was released, going on be nominated for 8 Oscars and winning three, a little known filmmaker from Toronto, François Girard, released Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould, a bio-pic of sorts about the man that many consider to be one of the world’s greatest pianist. Taking its structure from Bach’s Goldberg Variations, the film mixes short pieces of documentary, animation, narrative (with Colm Feore playing Gould), and performance to throw light on this complex artist. Girard commented that “as Gould was such a complex character, the biggest problem was to find a way to look at his work and deal with his visions. The film is built of fragments, each one trying to capture an aspect of Gould.” The film also helped break open the biopic genre to all sorts of experimentation and transformation, as well as becoming iconic for innovative cinema. In 1996, for example, The Simpsons released their own tribute "22 Short Films About Springfield."

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