Flashback
A look back at this day in film history
November 22
November 2, 1975
Who Killed Pasolini?

Pier Paolo Pasolini died on November 2, 1975. One of the century’s great artists, the Italian director, poet, writer and political thinker lived a complex and contradictory life, the details of which embody many of the era’s great social, religious and political debates. An atheist, he filmed what many consider to be the best film about Jesus ever made (The Gospel According to St. Matthew). His Mamma Roma, the 1962 story of a middle-age prostitute played by Anna Magnani, was a shocking depiction of street-level poverty in Italy that still, within the framework of a neorealist melodrama, expressed Pasolini’s interest in Christian iconography. A lifelong Communist who abhorred the fascist politics of his youth, Pasolini made his last film, Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom, by setting the Marquis de Sade’s novel of transgression and torture in a Nazi-controlled, Northern Italian town in 1944. It is widely considered the most controversial film ever made. Pasolini would die before its release, murdered when he was repeatedly struck and run over by his own automobile. A 17-year-old hustler confessed to the crime, but Pasolini’s murder has always been shrouded in mystery, with some theorizing that a conspiracy opposed to his political views caused his death. Others claim that he was killed in an extortion attempt related to stolen footage from Salo. And one person, Pasolini’s friend and painter Giuseppe Zigaina, argued that the director staged his own death. In 2005, Pasolini’s killer recanted his confession, claiming that he was forced to admit to the crime under threat to his family. The case was briefly reopened but the judicial inquiry led nowhere.


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Mark Ruffalo born

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November 22, 2002
Far From Heaven opens

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November 22, 1963
The Film Seen Round the World

On November 22, 1963, an accidental filmmaker made what became the most obsessed over film of the twentieth century. Standing on a concrete overpass in Dallas, women’s clothing manufacturer Abraham Zapruder raised his Bell and Howell 8mm camera and tracked the motorcade that carried president John F. Kennedy through Dealy Plaza. Zapruder’s 27 seconds of footage shot from a clear, elevated vantage point are the only complete recording of Kennedy’s assassination and a focal point for government investigators and conspiracy theorists alike. The film also became the object of one of the stranger ownership tussles in modern cinema. Zapruder gave copies of his film to the Secret Service and, three days after the shooting, sold the negative and all rights to Life Magazine. Zapruder’s heirs later disputed the sale, and the film was eventually returned to them by Life owner Time Inc. for $1 dollar. In 1992, however, the U.S. declared the film an “assassination record” and the property of the government. A lengthy dispute ensued over the amount Zapruder’s heirs should be paid. The government proposed paying the family $3 to $5 million; the Zapruders argued that the film should be valued similarly to recent sales of a Van Gogh painting and an Andy Warhol silk screen of Marilyn Monroe. Finally, arbitrators worked out a value of $16 million. Shortly thereafter, Zapruder’s heirs donated one of the original copies of the film and its copyright to the Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, which now oversees all rights requests.

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