A look back at this day in film history
November 29
November 2, 1975
Who Killed Pasolini?

Pier Paolo Pasolini died on November 2, 1975. One of the century’s great artists, the Italian director, poet, writer and political thinker lived a complex and contradictory life, the details of which embody many of the era’s great social, religious and political debates. An atheist, he filmed what many consider to be the best film about Jesus ever made (The Gospel According to St. Matthew). His Mamma Roma, the 1962 story of a middle-age prostitute played by Anna Magnani, was a shocking depiction of street-level poverty in Italy that still, within the framework of a neorealist melodrama, expressed Pasolini’s interest in Christian iconography. A lifelong Communist who abhorred the fascist politics of his youth, Pasolini made his last film, Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom, by setting the Marquis de Sade’s novel of transgression and torture in a Nazi-controlled, Northern Italian town in 1944. It is widely considered the most controversial film ever made. Pasolini would die before its release, murdered when he was repeatedly struck and run over by his own automobile. A 17-year-old hustler confessed to the crime, but Pasolini’s murder has always been shrouded in mystery, with some theorizing that a conspiracy opposed to his political views caused his death. Others claim that he was killed in an extortion attempt related to stolen footage from Salo. And one person, Pasolini’s friend and painter Giuseppe Zigaina, argued that the director staged his own death. In 2005, Pasolini’s killer recanted his confession, claiming that he was forced to admit to the crime under threat to his family. The case was briefly reopened but the judicial inquiry led nowhere.

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Jorge Muller and Carmen Bueno November 29, 1974
Carmen Bueno and Jorge Muller arrested

On Friday, November 29, 25-year-old film actress Carmen Bueno and 27 year-old cameraman Jorge Muller were working a documentary for the Peace Committee of the Chilean Churches when a dark car pulled beside them, shoved them in the back seat, and tore off.

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November 29, 1981
Natalie Wood dies

Hollywood legend Natalie Wood died November 29, 1981, at the age of 43. Wood first impressed audiences at the age 9 when she appeared in two Hollywood films: The Ghost and Mrs. Muir and, most famously, Miracle on 34th St.

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November 29, 1945
Wilder's Lost Weekend

In 1945 Billy Wilder followed his hit film Double Indemnity, co-written with Raymond Chandler, with what was, for its era, a bold and startling movie––The Lost Weekend. “How daring can the screen dare to be?” asked the marketing materials, as Wilder and star Ray Milland chronicled a frustrated writer’s four-day drinking binge with the same expressionistic lighting and camera that Wilder previously used to depict noir obsession and betrayal. The film won four Oscars, including Best Actor, Director and Screenplay, surprising those who argued, pre-release, that the film was too shocking for theater audiences. Also, the alcohol industry lobbied Paramount Pictures against releasing the film (Wilder claimed Paramount was offered $5 million to shelve the picture) while temperance groups fought against it too, feeling that the pic glamorized drinking.  But there were still some aspects of its story that the filmmakers avoided. In the Charles Jackson novel on which the film is based, Milland’s character is driven to drink by the shame of a homosexual affair. In the film, his alcoholism is “explained” by a case of writer’s block.

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