A look back at this day in film history
November 26
November 12, 1943
Wallace Shawn born

While many know Wallace Shawn as the loveable (or loathsome), pudgy clown in films like Clueless or The Princess Bride, there is another more serious side to him. Wallace Shawn was born among New York’s smart set. As the son of longtime New Yorker editor William Shawn, Wally went to the best schools (Dalton, Putney, Harvard, Oxford) and was on first-name basis with America’s best and brightest. Shawn later wrote about his teachers and others treatment of him: “I didn’t’ realize why they were groveling at my feet, and it made me a very self-confident person until the age of forty, when I figured it out––when I had a crisis of confidence.” In his confidence, Shawn was a daring playwright. Much of his early theatrical works were verbally violent and sexually explicit.  His 1971 A Thought in Three Parts became the center of public controversy when it was threatened with censorship as obscenity in London. Later work, often allegorical, focused on government repression. While often dark and abstract, three of his plays––The Designator Mourner, Marie and Bruce and The Fever––have been adapted into films. Shawn has also long been in a voice in left-wing politics, writing regularly for The Nation and starting his own short-lived political journal. Yet despite such high-brow pursuits, for many Wallace Shawn will always be the querulous, high-pitched voice of Rex the Dinosaur in Toy Story.

More Flashbacks
Casablanca November 26, 1942
Casablanca released

In New York City, stars, including Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, gathered for the premiere of Casablanca.

Read more »
November 26, 1993
Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould released

Few knew what to expect from a film called Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould when it opened in New York.

Read more »
November 26, 1993
A Life in Fragments

In the same month and year that Jane Campion’s The Piano was released, going on be nominated for 8 Oscars and winning three, a little known filmmaker from Toronto, François Girard, released Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould, a bio-pic of sorts about the man that many consider to be one of the world’s greatest pianist. Taking its structure from Bach’s Goldberg Variations, the film mixes short pieces of documentary, animation, narrative (with Colm Feore playing Gould), and performance to throw light on this complex artist. Girard commented that “as Gould was such a complex character, the biggest problem was to find a way to look at his work and deal with his visions. The film is built of fragments, each one trying to capture an aspect of Gould.” The film also helped break open the biopic genre to all sorts of experimentation and transformation, as well as becoming iconic for innovative cinema. In 1996, for example, The Simpsons released their own tribute "22 Short Films About Springfield."

Read more »