Flashback
A look back at this day in film history
August 31
October 12, 1966
Shirley Temple resigns from San Francisco Festival

When Mai Zetterling’s Nattlek (Night Games) arrived at the San Francisco Film Festival in 1966, the ex-child star Shirley Temple Black was horrified. This was not the kind of film that she wanted to endorse when she joined the festival’s board in 1964. The third feature form the controversial Swedish actress-turned-director, Night Games was adapted from her own novel about a married couple who return to the groom’s castle to discover a crazy night of orgiastic parties and repressed memories. John Waters later wrote with much admiration, “Zetterling directs with a ludicrously melodramatic, overly gothic sledgehammer to deal with this story of impotence, child masturbation, cross-dressing, porno flicks, and vomiting.” The film certainly arrived in San Francisco with a lot of baggage. At the Venice Film Festival, Night Games was withdrawn from public viewing and could only be watched by the jurors. When the San Francisco Film Festival refused to withdraw the film as Black insisted, she quit in protest, hoping to send a message to other festivals, as well as keep her image clean for her upcoming Congressional run. The film continued to create controversy, much of which was directed at the filmmaker. But Zetterling was oblivious. She once said, “Perhaps I am a mad-hatter Swede…who got lost in the world ... I feel very far from the norm of just about everything."


More Flashbacks
Jean Seberg August 31, 1979
Jean Seberg dies

With her close-cropped blonde hair and plucky, can-do charm hawking newspapers on the streets of Paris, American-born Jean Seberg became one the iconographic figures of the French New Wave by starring in one of its most important films: Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless.

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August 31, 1946
The Big Sleep released

One of film noir’s most confusing hits was released in its final form on August 31, 1946.

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31 August 1946
Sleep Disorder

With such literary greats as Raymond Chandler and William Faulkner behind it, how did The Big Sleep become one of the most confusing plots in film history?

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