Flashback
A look back at this day in film history
October 29
My Dinner With Andre October 11, 1981
My Dinner with Andre opens

The 1991 arthouse hit My Dinner with Andre was borne out of extended taped conversations by playwright and actor Wallace Shawn and theater director Andre Gregory. The two were old friends, and they had the idea to make a movie based, as Gregory told Sight and Sound magazine, “on ourselves.” As he related, “After months of study, of sifting through and cataloguing the material, sentence by sentence, in a sort of confused and miserable way, certain themes began to emerge; somewhere inside several layers of wrapping, there were certain subjects, certain concerns. Also, two fictional characters, distinct and amusing, seemed to be vaguely visible underneath the incomprehensible surface of the actual people we were." The film that came out featured these polar opposite personalities talking about the Big Stuff over dinner, and it became one of the most celebrated American independent films of its day, partly due to its surprising — and surprisingly achieved — box-office success. Bought by New Yorker Films after its premiere at the 1980 Telluride Film Festival, My Dinner with Andre was distributed by a team including now-filmmaker Jeff Lipsky in a manner that would be almost unheard of today. It was kept in theaters for weeks even though grosses were declining, and it was even extended after Gregory "groveled and begged" in front of New Yorker's Dan Talbot. As recounted in David Rosen's Off Hollywood, the grosses picked up, and on continued modest advertising spends, the movie became a surprise hit. Critics Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert on their weekly television show raved the film, declaring it one of the best of the year, and it went on to play at New York's Lincoln Plaza an astonishing 54 weeks — something that would be simply unheard now. In L.A. at the Westland Twin theater, the film's grosses in week 17 were three times what they were in week one. In the days before home video, pay-per-view and streaming, and before the internet forever changed the notion of the water cooler, "word of mouth" meant something a little different in the film world than it does today. It meant that audiences knew that had to see something when it came out, that they couldn't wait until some future delivery window, and that if they didn't urge their friends to see it they'd miss out on something great.


More Flashbacks
The Naked Kiss October 29, 1964
The Naked Kiss opens

A prostitute thrashes the drunken pimp who has stiffed her. As they fight, he reaches up and grabs her hair — and winds up with a fistful of her wig.

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October 29, 1993
The Nightmare before Christmas opens

Director Henry Selick made his feature directorial debut with The Nightmare Before Christmas, a stop-motion animated film about dual Christmas and Halloween worlds and the battle between them when the monsters and demons of the latter decide to place themselves in the world of the former.

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October 29, 2008
Being Different

The first outing from director Spike Jonze and writer Charlie Kaufman took audiences into a strange headspace.

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