Flashback
A look back at this day in film history
October 19
October 6, 1927
Jolson’s Jazz Singer breaks the movie sound barrier

It is not hyperbole to say that The Jazz Singer, released 80 years ago today, changed everything. The legendary All Jolson movie was the original “talkie,” with the newly developed Vitaphone sound system piping songs and dialogue into theater auditoriums for the very first time. Jolson’s words, “Wait a minute, wait a minute, you ain't heard nothin' yet!,” were the first in spoken in movie history — but with a lot of audiences, they really hadn’t heard anything yet. The Jazz Singer was a major success and one of the biggest films of 1927, but was not the overwhelming smash hit it could have been because most movie theaters outside of the major cities had not yet installed sound systems. It was not until 1928 that movie lovers throughout the country got to hear — rather than just see — what all the fuss was about.


More Flashbacks
Funny Girl October 19, 1968
Funny Girl opens

In the fall of 1968, William Wyler’s film version of the musical Funny Girl presented American audiences with one of the most celebrated pairings of character and actor in film history: Barbra Streisand playing Fanny Brice.

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October 19, 1978
Gig Young's murder-suicide

Gig Young had only been married to Kim Schmidt, a 31-year-old script supervisor he’d met while making Game of Death, for three weeks before he shot her in the back of the head and then turned the gun on himself.

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October 19, 1977
Looking Again for Mister Goodbar

Diane Keaton played the teacher with a dual existence in this landmark movie of the 70s.

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