Flashback
A look back at this day in film history
November 26
November 15, 1967
François Ozon born

Born in Paris in 1967, a year before the city was rocked by protests and revolution, François Ozon would continue that revolutionary spirit in a very different way. Interested in film from childhood, he was a voracious consumer of movies, a love that armed him well for getting his masters degree in cinema before moving on to FEMIS, France’s elite film school (where he came under the tutelage of Eric Rohmer). Immensely productive, Ozon made 14 short films, screened at festivals around the world, before two of his shorts––A Summer Dress and See the Sea––gained international attention. Ozon has gone on to be one of France’s talented and enigmatic auteurs. Shifting cinematic styles from film to film, he mix and matches elements of mystery (8 WomenSwimming Pool), musicals (8 WomenWater Drops on Burning Rocks), and melodrama (Criminal LoversUnder the Sand) and cinematic influences (Rohmer, Fassbinder, Buñuel, Hitchcock, Sirk). Like the figures of the French New Wave who were popular at the time of his birth, Ozon has re-fashioned the elements of classical cinema to fit his unique vision––fashionable, unexpected, and a little bit queer.


More Flashbacks
Casablanca November 26, 1942
Casablanca released

In New York City, stars, including Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, gathered for the premiere of Casablanca.

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November 26, 1993
Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould released

Few knew what to expect from a film called Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould when it opened in New York.

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November 26, 1993
A Life in Fragments

In the same month and year that Jane Campion’s The Piano was released, going on be nominated for 8 Oscars and winning three, a little known filmmaker from Toronto, François Girard, released Thirty Two Short Films About Glenn Gould, a bio-pic of sorts about the man that many consider to be one of the world’s greatest pianist. Taking its structure from Bach’s Goldberg Variations, the film mixes short pieces of documentary, animation, narrative (with Colm Feore playing Gould), and performance to throw light on this complex artist. Girard commented that “as Gould was such a complex character, the biggest problem was to find a way to look at his work and deal with his visions. The film is built of fragments, each one trying to capture an aspect of Gould.” The film also helped break open the biopic genre to all sorts of experimentation and transformation, as well as becoming iconic for innovative cinema. In 1996, for example, The Simpsons released their own tribute "22 Short Films About Springfield."

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