A look back at this day in film history
November 23
November 13, 1986
Color Me Mad

Director John Huston, 80 years old and suffering from severe emphysema, was wheeled out with oxygen tank on Thursday 13 November to give a press conference about a plan to colorize his 1941 classic The Maltese Falcon. “It would almost seem as though a conspiracy exists to degrade our national character,” complained the legendary Hollywood director. His voice joined many others (including Martin Scorsese and Woody Allen) who spoke out against the recent decision by Ted Turner and the Turner Broadcasting System to colorize 100 famous black & white films. Turner, who’d recently purchased the MGM library, was hoping to use colorizing video technology to bring new life to old entertainment, especially since market reports indicated that both video renters and television viewers appeared to be allergic black-and-white films. But for filmmakers, this commercial ploy was abuse of corporate ownership and infringement of artistic rights.

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Kinski November 23, 1991
Klaus Kinski dies

When it came time for his longtime collaborator, Werner Herzog, to make a movie about his relationship with the brilliant and mad actor Klaus Kinski, he titled it My Best Fiend

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November 23, 1995
Louis Malle dies

The great French film director Louis Malle passed away on this day in 1995 after a battle with lymphoma, leaving behind his wife, actress Candice Bergen, and their child together, Chloe Malle.

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November 23, 1990
Klaus Kinski Dies

Klaus Kinski, one of the most fearsome, intense and memorable stars of the cinema, fought his last battle 17 years ago this week. Born Nikolaus Karl Günther Nakszyński in 1926 in what is now Poland, Kinski will forever be best remembered as Werner Herzog's foe and frequent collaborator: together Herzog and Kinski made five films together, Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972), Woyzeck (1979), Nosferatu the Vampyre (1979), Fitzcarraldo (1982), and Cobra Verde (1987). That they made so many is miraculous as Kinski was infamously belligerent and had a relationship with Herzog (fascinatingly chronicled in the documentary My Best Fiend) which was tense at best, and all out war at worst. Married three times, Kinski was the father of actress Nastassja Kinski and –– according to his sensationalist autobiography, Kinski: All I Need Is Love –– four other children. A year after completing Kinski Paganini (1989), a film Kinski wrote, directed and starred in about the Italian composer (with whom he supposedly felt a demonic kinship), Kinski succumbed to a heart attack at his home in Lagunitas, California, aged just 65.

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