A look back at this day in film history
October 23
October 4, 1895
Baby Buster

Buster Keaton was born on this day in 1895 in Piqua, Kansas, where his mother Myra happened to be while touring with Keaton’s father Joe, the co-owner with Harry Houdini of a traveling show called the Mohawk Indian Medicine Company (they sold medicine on the side, hence the name). Keaton was born Joseph Frank Keaton VI but got the nickname “Buster” at about the age of six months: he fell down a long flight of stairs and when he was seemingly unharmed by the tumble, Houdini declared “That was a buster!” – and it stuck. Being from good ol’ vaudeville stock, it was only a matter of timer before Keaton was lured by the smell of the greasepaint and at the age of three he was performing with his mother and father in The Three Keatons. The act involved Myra playing sax, and Keaton Sr. manhandling cheeky Buster, throwing him around the stage, against scenery and into the orchestra pit; seemingly, he was indestructible. Despite the perception that Keaton was being subjected to child abuse, he later claimed that he loved the pratfalls, which didn’t hurt him because he knew how to fall properly. Keaton, in fact, says he would laugh while being kicked through the air, but noticed that the audience laughed less when he did so. As a result, while still little more than a baby, Keaton realized he had to put on a poker face, and so the trademark of a comedy genius came into being.

More Flashbacks
Sam Raimi October 23, 1959
Sam Raimi born

For the multiplex crowd, director Sam Raimi – who today celebrates his 51st birthday – is known first and foremost as the director of the Spider-Man movies, a franchise that has grossed close to $1.5 billion worldwide.

Read more »
October 23, 1979
Monty Python’s Life of Brian banned by Strom Thurmond

Did you ever hear the one about the turncoat South Carolina Senator and the edgy Biblical comedy?

Read more »
October 23, 1992
Tarantino Lets the Dogs Out

QT’s debut referenced great heist movies of the past but now stands as a classic in its own right.

Read more »