Flashback
A look back at this day in film history
August 30
November 16, 1945
The Lost Weekend Premieres in NYC

On the train ride from Los Angeles to New York City, Billy Wilder picked up four novels, with Charles Jackson’s harrowing tale of alcoholic writer The Lost Weekend being one them. As soon as Wilder’s train pulled in Manhattan’s Grand Central Station, he called his old writing partner Charles Brackett back in LA to get him on board with the film. But why such a downbeat tale? Some suggest his recent experience with Raymond Chandler’s alcoholic behavior while co-writing Double Indemnity propelled Wilder's desire to understand the disease. In the novel, the main character drank over guilt of a homosexual affair, but in the film Wilder changed that to writer's block. Wilder convinced Paramount to greenlight the project, but the production faced challenges at every stage. Ray Milland was wary of starring as a drunk. Studios execs were nervous about the downbeat tale. Even the liquor industry, according to Wilder, want to quash the project, supposedly offering Paramount $5 million to sell them the negative. When it first showed, the audience reaction was so bad that Paramount almost buried it. But when the film finally was released, it was greeted with much critical acclaim. The film was nominated for seven oscars, winning four: Best Actor (Ray Milland), Best Director (Billy Wilder), Best Screenplay (Wilder and Charles Brackett) and Best Picture. Miklós Rózsa was nominated for Best Music for his innovative score that included the first use of theremin in a film.


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The Last House on the Left August 30, 1972
The Last House on the Left opens

Director Wes Craven is best known for the inventive Nightmare on Elm Street horror films. Producer and director Sean Cunningham has earned a place in film history for birthing Jason Voorhees, the masked killer in the Friday the 13th series.

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August 30, 1967
Point Blank Opens

Following his debut film, Catch Us if You Can, which starred the Dave Clark Five in an odd yet technically dazzling capturing of the '60s pop culture zeitgeist, John Boorman traveled to America to make his first studio picture.

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30 August 1940
A Dance To Remember

A flop when it was released, Dance, Girl, Dance slowly found its audience as fans recognized the complex feminist drama at the heart of this musical.

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