News & Views

Baby Professionals Share Their Favorite Baby Films

Favorite Things: Baby Films

Baby Professionals Share Their Favorite Baby Films

To celebrate the release of Focus Features’ movie Babies, FilmInFocus asked a group of people whose work involves new arrivals to pick their top baby-related movies.

more

Christine Fugate's Five Favorite Films
1
null

Mr. Mom

When I was a kid, my sister and I would watch this film, laughing over Michael Keaton’s antics as a stay-at-home dad. After watching him change a diaper and rev up a chain saw, I was never able to take him seriously as Batman.

2
null

Baby Boom

This came out around the time I was deciding which career to pursue. JC’s dilemma made me realize that, despite feminism, you can’t easily wear a suit and take care of a baby. That said, motherhood never looked so good as Diane Keaton raises her kid, creates a baby food business and dates Sam Shepard. If single motherhood were that much fun, the birth rate would truly rise.

3
null

Baby's Day Out

I recently watched this John Hughes flick with my seven year old. I never could stand the talking baby movies-they annoy me. Thank goodness Baby Bink, the star of this film, just crawls around dangerous places without speaking. The buffoon adults provide enough entertainment to grin and bear the scenes of ‘baby crossing the street’ and ‘baby climbing out of the taxi.” Lara Flynn Boyle does an especially good job of over-acting the part of a concerned mom.

4
null

Raising Arizona

Who can resist Nicholas Cage and Holly Hunter as a couple so desperate to be parents that they steal a baby? The antics in this film are hilarious. Nathan Jr., the baby, is kidnapped by a cop, bank robbers and a bounty hunter and eventually left in the middle of the road. He never cries, but most of the adults do. Every parent can relate to the final scene of giving the baby back without repercussions. Only in the movies can such an act take place.

5
null

Rosemary's Baby

Polanski’s film about bearing the devil’s child is enough to scare anyone away from procreation. Ruth Gordon as the friendly neighbor who makes special shakes made me wary of any homemade treats delivered to my door during my pregnancies. This is not a movie for a newlywed or pregnant woman. Best to watch it when you are well immersed in parenthood. Then you can appreciate the fact that no matter how badly your kid behaves, you will always be the mom sacrificing every ounce of your soul for the joy of parenthood.

Christine Fugate
Christine Fugate
Christine Fugate

Christine Fugate’s work explores the complexities of women’s lives in today’s world. In 2008, she edited The Mothering Heights Manual for Motherhood: What we wish we knew before becoming a short order cook, shuttle driver, laundress, Mother, a #1 book in the motherhood section of Amazon.com. She writes a monthly column, “Mothering Heights,” for The Laguna Beach Independent, and “Vox Mom” for Coast Kids magazine, in addition to a blog at http://www.motheringheights.net/.  As a director she made the award-winning films The Southern Sex and Mother Love, while her movie Tobacco Blues was broadcast during POV’s 11th season, and screened on board Air Force One for President Clinton. Fugate’s feature-length documentary The Girl Next Door, following Oklahoma native Stacy Valentine’s rise to stardom in the adult film industry, had a successful theatrical run in over 25 cities throughout the US and Canada. Fugate has won numerous honors for her work, including the prestigious Columbus Film Festival Chris Award, the New York Expo Special Judges Award and a Cine Golden Eagle. Fugate was also named one of Showbiz Data’s Top 100 Directors of 2001. She is married with two daughters and currently lives in Laguna Beach. 

Share This:

 

 

More Favorite Things