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Charlotte Gainsbourg
Charlotte Gainsbourg

Mary Rivers

Charlotte Gainsbourg has starred in movies for many of Europe's preeminent filmmakers. She has twice won the César Award, her native France's equivalent of the Academy Award. Her first César win came at the age of 15, in Claude Miller's L'effrontée, for Most Promsing Actress. Her subsequent reteaming with the filmmaker on La petite voleuse (The Little Thief) brought her a César nomination for Best Actress. She was later nominated in the category again for her performance in Marion Vernoux' Love, etc. Most recently, her work in Danièle Thompson's La Bûche earned her the César for Best Supporting Actress.

She starred for her father, composer/filmmaker Serge Gainsbourg, in Charlotte for Ever; and starred with her mother, actress Jane Birkin, in Agnès Varda's Kung-Fu Master (cowritten by her mother). Under the direction of her uncle Andrew Birkin, Ms. Gainsbourg starred in The Cement Garden, which the director adapted from Ian McEwan's novel. The feature won several awards, including a Silver Bear Award at the Berlin International Film Festival for Best Director; the top prize at the Dinard [, France] British Film Festival in Dinard, France; and, for Ms. Gainsbourg, the Best Actress Award at the 1994 Festival Scrittura e Immagine.

Her other films include Elie Chouraqui's Paroles et Musique, Jacques Doillon's La Tentation d'Isabelle and Amoureuse, Paolo and Vittorio Taviani's Il sole anche di Notte, Bertrand Blier's Merci la vie, Eric Rochant's Aux yeux du monde and Anna Oz, Michel Blanc's Grosse fatigue, Franco Zeffirelli's Jane Eyre, David Bailey's The Intruder, Bruno Nyutten's Passionnément, Patrice Leconte's Felix et Lola, and her husband Yvan Attal's Ma Femme est une Actrice (My Wife is an Actress).

Ms. Gainsbourg has starred in the TNT miniseries Nuremberg (directed by Yves Simoneau), and as Fantine in the 2000 miniseries remake of Les Misérables (directed by Josée Dayan and broadcast in the U.S. on A&E).

On stage, she starred in the title role of David Mamet's Oleanna (directed by Maurice Benichou).